A ghostwriter in the machine? Attitudes of academic staff towards machine translation use in internationalised Higher Education

Mike GROVES, Klaus MUNDT*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Journal PublicationsJournal Article (refereed)peer-review

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Online translation has been freely available since the 1990s. In recent years its quality has been significantly improving, leading to instant translation which can easily be used as a reading or writing tool by students whose first language is not that of the institution where they study. For instance, students might use it to facilitate the composition of their essays in the language of instruction. However, such student use of online translation tools raises a number of important questions about their acceptability in Higher Education. As these questions remain unaddressed in the current literature, this paper presents novel findings from interviews with academic staff at two UK universities and examines the emerging themes. These include academic integrity, the meaning of the university brand and the need for language development. It then suggests that Higher Education Institutions need to engage in an informed and robust discussion of these issues to provide a consistent position on the place of Machine Translation in Higher Education.

Original languageEnglish
Article number100957
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of English for Academic Purposes
Volume50
Early online date15 Jan 2021
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2021
Externally publishedYes

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2021 Elsevier Ltd

Keywords

  • Academic integrity
  • Higher education
  • Machine translation
  • Policy: internationalisation

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