A logic of excessive

Research output: Other Conference ContributionsConference Paper (other)Research

Abstract

S. V. Srinivas' Megastar is a study of 'cinematic populism' in Telugu, India. It goes to the nuances of the complex relationship between popular cultural forms and mass politics to a point where the boundaries between 'the cinematic' and 'the political' are completely blurred. Read from Hong Kong, I find the case strikingly unique, if not exceptional. Yet it reminds me of the research topic of one of our graduating doctoral students, namely, the 'intellectual-stardom' (or intellectual celebrities) in nowadays China. Uniquely Chinese in a sense, the de-differentiation between 'the academic-intellectual' and 'the popular-fashionable' can indeed be traced back to the early days when the ideas of the western-modern first flooded into China. I find in these two cases a pattern suggesting, maybe, a logic of the excessive which constantly eludes the settled conceptual linearity often associated with modern-nationalism or liberal citizenship. My question is: to what extent can such a logic of the excessive facilitate us to think through the bigger problems of de-imperialization as posed by Kuan-Hsing Chen?
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - 18 Jun 2010
Event8th Crossroads in Cultural Studies Conference - Lingnan University, Hong Kong, Hong Kong
Duration: 17 Jun 201020 Jun 2010
http://cultstud.org/xr2010/crossroad/index.html (Event link)

Conference

Conference8th Crossroads in Cultural Studies Conference
CountryHong Kong
CityHong Kong
Period17/06/1020/06/10
OtherThe 8th Crossroads in Cultural Studies Conference will be held in Hong Kong during June 17 – 21, 2010. Hosted by Lingnan University and organized by its Department of Cultural Studies and Kwan Fong Cultural Research and Development Programme, this is the first Crossroads Conference to be held in East Asia.

Started in 1996 in Tampere, Finland, the Crossroads Conferences were to fill what was felt to be a gap in the international cultural studies community. Since then it had become one of the most important international conferences in cultural studies where scholars from all five continents get together to exchange their scholarly insights as well as to get in touch with different cultures. Organized by the Association for Cultural Studies (ACS), Crossroads conference is now held every two years in different parts of the world: Birmingham in UK, Illinois in US, Istanbul in Turkey and Kingston in Jamaica.
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intellectual
China
populism
VIP
nationalism
Hong Kong
citizenship
India
politics
student

Cite this

LAW, W. (2010). A logic of excessive. Paper presented at 8th Crossroads in Cultural Studies Conference, Hong Kong, Hong Kong.
LAW, Wing-sang. / A logic of excessive. Paper presented at 8th Crossroads in Cultural Studies Conference, Hong Kong, Hong Kong.
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title = "A logic of excessive",
abstract = "S. V. Srinivas' Megastar is a study of 'cinematic populism' in Telugu, India. It goes to the nuances of the complex relationship between popular cultural forms and mass politics to a point where the boundaries between 'the cinematic' and 'the political' are completely blurred. Read from Hong Kong, I find the case strikingly unique, if not exceptional. Yet it reminds me of the research topic of one of our graduating doctoral students, namely, the 'intellectual-stardom' (or intellectual celebrities) in nowadays China. Uniquely Chinese in a sense, the de-differentiation between 'the academic-intellectual' and 'the popular-fashionable' can indeed be traced back to the early days when the ideas of the western-modern first flooded into China. I find in these two cases a pattern suggesting, maybe, a logic of the excessive which constantly eludes the settled conceptual linearity often associated with modern-nationalism or liberal citizenship. My question is: to what extent can such a logic of the excessive facilitate us to think through the bigger problems of de-imperialization as posed by Kuan-Hsing Chen?",
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LAW, W 2010, 'A logic of excessive' Paper presented at 8th Crossroads in Cultural Studies Conference, Hong Kong, Hong Kong, 17/06/10 - 20/06/10, .

A logic of excessive. / LAW, Wing-sang.

2010. Paper presented at 8th Crossroads in Cultural Studies Conference, Hong Kong, Hong Kong.

Research output: Other Conference ContributionsConference Paper (other)Research

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AU - LAW, Wing-sang

PY - 2010/6/18

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AB - S. V. Srinivas' Megastar is a study of 'cinematic populism' in Telugu, India. It goes to the nuances of the complex relationship between popular cultural forms and mass politics to a point where the boundaries between 'the cinematic' and 'the political' are completely blurred. Read from Hong Kong, I find the case strikingly unique, if not exceptional. Yet it reminds me of the research topic of one of our graduating doctoral students, namely, the 'intellectual-stardom' (or intellectual celebrities) in nowadays China. Uniquely Chinese in a sense, the de-differentiation between 'the academic-intellectual' and 'the popular-fashionable' can indeed be traced back to the early days when the ideas of the western-modern first flooded into China. I find in these two cases a pattern suggesting, maybe, a logic of the excessive which constantly eludes the settled conceptual linearity often associated with modern-nationalism or liberal citizenship. My question is: to what extent can such a logic of the excessive facilitate us to think through the bigger problems of de-imperialization as posed by Kuan-Hsing Chen?

M3 - Conference Paper (other)

ER -

LAW W. A logic of excessive. 2010. Paper presented at 8th Crossroads in Cultural Studies Conference, Hong Kong, Hong Kong.