Access heterogeneities and collection time inequalities of drinking water sources in Ghana: implications for water and development policy

Godfred AMANKWAA*, Kwaku ABREFA BUSIA, Pascal AGBADI, Henry O. DUAH, Francis ARTHUR-HOLMES

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Journal PublicationsJournal Article (refereed)peer-review

Abstract

Time poverty remains a critical issue for water access across the globe. However, research on the time spent for water collection and the factors associated with collection time inequalities and access heterogeneities is limited, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. Drawing on the 2014 Ghana’s Demographic and Health Survey (DHS) data, and statistical and spatial analysis, we apply the concept of “everydayness” of water collection time poverty to examine the factors associated with water collection time inequalities and access heterogeneities of drinking water sources in Ghana. Our analysis shows that 8.6% of households face drinking water collection time poverty and this is prevalent and significant across different socio-economic groups and geographies. The observed geographical heterogeneity and collection time inequality in drinking water sources in this paper adds to the literature in terms of variation in household water insecurity across time and space. The water policy implications of these findings are discussed, and we highlight strategies to rethink drinking water security in the Global South.
Original languageEnglish
Article number16
Pages (from-to)263-278
Number of pages16
JournalLocal Environment
Volume29
Issue number3
Early online date2 Feb 2024
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2024

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2024 The Author(s). Published by Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.

Keywords

  • Drinking water source
  • Ghana
  • collection time poverty
  • inequalities
  • water access

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