Aging trends : Singapore

David Rosser PHILLIPS, Helen Patricia BARTLETT

Research output: Journal PublicationsJournal Article (refereed)Researchpeer-review

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Singapore is a small country with an area of approximately 633 square kilometres. It has had remarkable economic growth since its full independence in 1965, focusing on high-skill, high-level service sector activities that have so far proved popular and lucrative for the nation. Three major inter-related issues have emerged concerning population aging in Singapore. The first two concerns are whether aging will increase dependency on the state for welfare and financial assistance and whether traditional family caring structures will survive and provide the care deemed necessary in the future. The third concern focuses on the potential impact of population aging on Singapore's future economic growth and development.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)349-356
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Cross-Cultural Gerontology
Volume10
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 1995
Externally publishedYes

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Economic Development
Singapore
economic growth
trend
financial assistance
family structure
tertiary sector
Growth and Development
Population
welfare

Cite this

PHILLIPS, David Rosser ; BARTLETT, Helen Patricia. / Aging trends : Singapore. In: Journal of Cross-Cultural Gerontology. 1995 ; Vol. 10, No. 4. pp. 349-356.
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Aging trends : Singapore. / PHILLIPS, David Rosser; BARTLETT, Helen Patricia.

In: Journal of Cross-Cultural Gerontology, Vol. 10, No. 4, 01.12.1995, p. 349-356.

Research output: Journal PublicationsJournal Article (refereed)Researchpeer-review

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