American hegemony and China's U.S. policy

Research output: Journal PublicationsJournal Article (refereed)Researchpeer-review

Abstract

This article challenges the premature assumption that a power transition between the United States and China is inevitable due to China's rapid rise. It argues that the United States will remain the hegemonic power for the next half century. Based on this projection, China must adopt a policy of cooperation with the U.S.-dominated international order. China also needs to actively participate in the various institutions of the global system and learn the art of leadership. This policy will allow China gradually to increase its global influence in ways that are more compatible with its rising power. As a result, China will not need to become a revisionist state and challenge the system from the outside. Recently, many signs indicate that China is indeed moving toward a more active role in regional and global affairs.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)87-113
Number of pages27
JournalAsian Perspective
Volume28
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2004

Fingerprint

hegemony
China
projection
leadership

Cite this

@article{cd7f223044ab4122a50bb86f8daecd8c,
title = "American hegemony and China's U.S. policy",
abstract = "This article challenges the premature assumption that a power transition between the United States and China is inevitable due to China's rapid rise. It argues that the United States will remain the hegemonic power for the next half century. Based on this projection, China must adopt a policy of cooperation with the U.S.-dominated international order. China also needs to actively participate in the various institutions of the global system and learn the art of leadership. This policy will allow China gradually to increase its global influence in ways that are more compatible with its rising power. As a result, China will not need to become a revisionist state and challenge the system from the outside. Recently, many signs indicate that China is indeed moving toward a more active role in regional and global affairs.",
author = "Baohui ZHANG",
year = "2004",
month = "1",
day = "1",
language = "English",
volume = "28",
pages = "87--113",
journal = "Asian Perspective",
issn = "0258-9184",
publisher = "Lynne Rienner Publishers",
number = "3",

}

American hegemony and China's U.S. policy. / ZHANG, Baohui.

In: Asian Perspective, Vol. 28, No. 3, 01.01.2004, p. 87-113.

Research output: Journal PublicationsJournal Article (refereed)Researchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - American hegemony and China's U.S. policy

AU - ZHANG, Baohui

PY - 2004/1/1

Y1 - 2004/1/1

N2 - This article challenges the premature assumption that a power transition between the United States and China is inevitable due to China's rapid rise. It argues that the United States will remain the hegemonic power for the next half century. Based on this projection, China must adopt a policy of cooperation with the U.S.-dominated international order. China also needs to actively participate in the various institutions of the global system and learn the art of leadership. This policy will allow China gradually to increase its global influence in ways that are more compatible with its rising power. As a result, China will not need to become a revisionist state and challenge the system from the outside. Recently, many signs indicate that China is indeed moving toward a more active role in regional and global affairs.

AB - This article challenges the premature assumption that a power transition between the United States and China is inevitable due to China's rapid rise. It argues that the United States will remain the hegemonic power for the next half century. Based on this projection, China must adopt a policy of cooperation with the U.S.-dominated international order. China also needs to actively participate in the various institutions of the global system and learn the art of leadership. This policy will allow China gradually to increase its global influence in ways that are more compatible with its rising power. As a result, China will not need to become a revisionist state and challenge the system from the outside. Recently, many signs indicate that China is indeed moving toward a more active role in regional and global affairs.

UR - http://commons.ln.edu.hk/sw_master/3567

M3 - Journal Article (refereed)

VL - 28

SP - 87

EP - 113

JO - Asian Perspective

JF - Asian Perspective

SN - 0258-9184

IS - 3

ER -