An evaluation of Hong Kong's corporate code of ethics initiative

Robin Stanley SNELL, Neil C. HERNDON

Research output: Journal PublicationsJournal Article (refereed)Researchpeer-review

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A campaign by the Independent Commission Against Corruption, begun in 1994, led to over 1,600 Hong Kong companies and trade associations adopting codes of ethics by December 1996. This study analyzed motives for code adoption; code content; how codes were developed, supported and enforced; and code impact. Primary data was collected through cross-sectional and longitudinal surveys, semi-structured interviews, observation, and document analysis. Press cuttings and published statistics were also used. Main findings were that some best practice prescriptions for code adoption were not followed, but that codes nonetheless helped preserve ethical standards and an anti-corruption image. Directions are suggested for further research into cultural effects on business ethics policy, practice and effectiveness.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)493-518
Number of pages26
JournalAsia Pacific Journal of Management
Volume17
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2000

Fingerprint

Evaluation
Code of ethics
Hong Kong
Prescription
Business ethics
Corruption
Statistics
Trade associations
Anti-corruption
Structured interview
Best practice
Ethical standards

Cite this

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An evaluation of Hong Kong's corporate code of ethics initiative. / SNELL, Robin Stanley; HERNDON, Neil C.

In: Asia Pacific Journal of Management, Vol. 17, No. 3, 01.01.2000, p. 493-518.

Research output: Journal PublicationsJournal Article (refereed)Researchpeer-review

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