Appropriation of the "Other" : Contrasting Notions of China in British Literature

Research output: Journal PublicationsJournal Article (refereed)Researchpeer-review

Abstract

This paper uses Oliver Goldsmith’s The Citizen of the World and W. Somerset Maugham’s On a Chinese Screen as two examples to illustrate how and why different notions of China have been appropriated. The discussion builds upon and seeks to expand a long tradition of Chinese interest in their presentations in Western literature by linking the two texts to their respective epochal ethos.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)313-325
Number of pages13
JournalNeohelicon
Volume32
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Nov 2005

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China
literature
Appropriation
British Literature
Ethos

Cite this

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Appropriation of the "Other" : Contrasting Notions of China in British Literature. / DING, Ersu.

In: Neohelicon, Vol. 32, No. 2, 01.11.2005, p. 313-325.

Research output: Journal PublicationsJournal Article (refereed)Researchpeer-review

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