Can interpersonal competition be constructive within organizations?

Dean William TJOSVOLD, David W. JOHNSON, Roger T. JOHNSON, Haifa SUN

Research output: Journal PublicationsJournal Article (refereed)

50 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

An empirical analysis was conducted on the conditions under which competition can be constructive. The participants were 64 managers and 28 employees from organizations in mainland China. They were asked to describe specific incidents of competition between them and their fellow employees and rate on a 7-point Likert-type scale the conditions that they perceived affected the outcomes. The incidents could involve either a physical activity or an intellectual task or both. Results showed that the variables related to constructive competition included the fairness of the rules, the motivation to win, having an advantage that enhanced one's chances of winning, a strong positive relationship among competitors, and a history of confirming each other's competence. By controlling these factors, the constructiveness of competition may be enhanced.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)63-84
Number of pages22
JournalThe Journal of Psychology : Interdisciplinary and Applied
Volume137
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2003

Fingerprint

Mental Competency
Motivation
China
Organizations
incident
employee
fairness
manager
Incidents
Employees
history
Competitors
Empirical analysis
Factors
Physical activity
Fairness
Mainland China
Managers

Keywords

  • Competition
  • Constructive competition
  • Cooperation
  • Social interdependence

Cite this

TJOSVOLD, Dean William ; JOHNSON, David W. ; JOHNSON, Roger T. ; SUN, Haifa. / Can interpersonal competition be constructive within organizations?. In: The Journal of Psychology : Interdisciplinary and Applied. 2003 ; Vol. 137, No. 1. pp. 63-84.
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Can interpersonal competition be constructive within organizations? / TJOSVOLD, Dean William; JOHNSON, David W.; JOHNSON, Roger T.; SUN, Haifa.

In: The Journal of Psychology : Interdisciplinary and Applied, Vol. 137, No. 1, 01.01.2003, p. 63-84.

Research output: Journal PublicationsJournal Article (refereed)

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