Childhood adversity and behavioural addictions: the mediating role of emotion dysregulation and depression in an adult community sample

M. S. M. LIM, F. Y. L. CHEUNG, J. M. KOH, C. S-K TANG

Research output: Journal PublicationsJournal Article (refereed)

Abstract

Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) increase developmental vulnerabilities for adult psychopathology, and behavioural addictions in particular. However, our understanding of the common psychological mechanisms underlying various behavioural addictions is currently limited. The present study explores self-report emotion dysregulation and depression severity as candidate transdiagnostic processes for addictions known to be related to ACEs such as gambling, food, and internet (social media) use. A large community sample of working adults (n = 1,231) was surveyed online. Validated self-report assessments of gambling, food, and social media addiction severity were administered. The study found that cumulative ACEs were linked to clinical symptoms of gambling, food, and social media addiction through the mediator of emotion dysregulation. Specific emotion dysregulation mechanisms common to gambling, food, and social media addictions include poor control of impulses when upset, and poor clarity about emotions. Additionally, emotion dysregulation and depression serially mediated the association between ACEs, and food and social media addiction severity. The study specifies emotion- and mood-related clinical targets for clinical assessments and interventions that could benefit adults with a history of ACEs.
Original languageEnglish
JournalAddiction Research and Theory
Early online date23 May 2019
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 23 May 2019

Fingerprint

Social Media
Gambling
Emotions
Depression
Food
Self Report
Psychopathology
Internet
Psychology

Bibliographical note

Funding for this study was provided by the National University of Singapore Academic Research Fund (NUS ARF). The NUS ARF had no role in the study design, collection, analysis or interpretation of the data, writing the manuscript, or the decision to submit the paper for publication.

Keywords

  • Adverse childhood experiences
  • behavioural addiction
  • depression
  • difficulties in emotion regulation

Cite this

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title = "Childhood adversity and behavioural addictions: the mediating role of emotion dysregulation and depression in an adult community sample",
abstract = "Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) increase developmental vulnerabilities for adult psychopathology, and behavioural addictions in particular. However, our understanding of the common psychological mechanisms underlying various behavioural addictions is currently limited. The present study explores self-report emotion dysregulation and depression severity as candidate transdiagnostic processes for addictions known to be related to ACEs such as gambling, food, and internet (social media) use. A large community sample of working adults (n = 1,231) was surveyed online. Validated self-report assessments of gambling, food, and social media addiction severity were administered. The study found that cumulative ACEs were linked to clinical symptoms of gambling, food, and social media addiction through the mediator of emotion dysregulation. Specific emotion dysregulation mechanisms common to gambling, food, and social media addictions include poor control of impulses when upset, and poor clarity about emotions. Additionally, emotion dysregulation and depression serially mediated the association between ACEs, and food and social media addiction severity. The study specifies emotion- and mood-related clinical targets for clinical assessments and interventions that could benefit adults with a history of ACEs.",
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Childhood adversity and behavioural addictions: the mediating role of emotion dysregulation and depression in an adult community sample. / LIM, M. S. M.; CHEUNG, F. Y. L.; KOH, J. M.; TANG, C. S-K.

In: Addiction Research and Theory, 23.05.2019.

Research output: Journal PublicationsJournal Article (refereed)

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