Conducting Qualitative Work–Family Research across Cultures

Sowan WONG, Vivian Miu-Chi LUN

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Abstract

Qualitative research is a valuable tool in discovering the local meanings and individual experiences of the work–family interface in different cultures. The goal of qualitative research is to help investigators understand and clarify specific phenomena of interest from a particular social-cultural context. Work–family global qualitative studies can be divided into two groups, those that focus on a single culture - and cross-cultural comparisons which include multiple countries or cultures. This chapter highlights several specific issues to be considered when conducting cross-cultural, qualitative research specifically with a focus on the work–family interface. The target population is an important consideration in qualitative research. The decision-making process will depend on the theoretical assumptions, and the specific cultural backgrounds of the cultural groups studied. The issue of sample size has been a long-contended issue in qualitative research. Qualitative interviews and focus groups are two common data collection methods used in qualitative research. Common qualitative data analytical approaches adopted in work–family research includes content analysis, thematic analysis, and template analysis. Cultural values and beliefs influence individuals' perception of work and family, and the perception of work–family conflict may vary in different cultural contexts.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationThe Cambridge handbook of the global work-family interface
Subtitle of host publicationPart III - Methodological Considerations
EditorsKristen M. SHOCKLEY, Winny SHEN, Ryan C. JOHNSON
PublisherCambridge University Press
Chapter9
Pages179-192
Number of pages14
ISBN (Print)9781108235556
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2018

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WONG, S., & LUN, V. M-C. (2018). Conducting Qualitative Work–Family Research across Cultures. In K. M. SHOCKLEY, W. SHEN, & R. C. JOHNSON (Eds.), The Cambridge handbook of the global work-family interface: Part III - Methodological Considerations (pp. 179-192). Cambridge University Press. https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108235556.009