Constructive conflict in China : cooperative conflict as a bridge between east and west

Dean William TJOSVOLD, Chun HUI, S., Kenneth LAW

Research output: Journal PublicationsJournal Article (refereed)

38 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The Chinese value of harmony is often considered literally as the need to avoid conflict. Recent experiments have shown that Chinese people can value and use conflict to explore issues, make effective decisions, and strengthen relationships when they communicate that they want to manage the conflict for mutual benefit rather than win at the other's expense. Field studies document that cooperative conflict dynamics contribute to effective teamwork, quality service, and leadership in China. Chinese managers and employees are able to use participation and other management innovations to become partners in discussing issues and solving problems. Although more research is needed, the Chinese and their international partners appear to be able to use cooperative conflict to discuss their differences open-mindedly and forge productive, market-oriented organizations.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)166-183
Number of pages18
JournalJournal of World Business
Volume36
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2001

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China
Participation
Problem solving
Field study
Chinese values
Harmony
Chinese managers
Management innovation
Employees
Team work
Expenses
Experiment
Service quality

Cite this

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Constructive conflict in China : cooperative conflict as a bridge between east and west. / TJOSVOLD, Dean William; HUI, Chun; LAW, S., Kenneth.

In: Journal of World Business, Vol. 36, No. 2, 01.01.2001, p. 166-183.

Research output: Journal PublicationsJournal Article (refereed)

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