Corporate Social Responsibility and Tax Reporting Aggressiveness in a Transition Economy

Suwina CHENG, Kenny Z. LIN

Research output: Other Conference ContributionsPresentationPresentation

Abstract

This paper examines the relationship between corporate social responsibility (CSR) and corporate tax in an environment where we expect this relation to be affected by the degree of market and institutional developments. Taking advantage of substantial cross regional variations in institutions in China, we find that in regions with a lower level of institutional development, firms claiming to act socially responsible engage more in aggressive tax reporting, consistent with the stockholder view of corporate social responsibility (CSR). In contrast, we find that in institutionally stronger regions, corporate social responsibility is more aligned with the social responsibility aspect of tax compliance, which supports the stakeholder view of CSR. Our results suggest that absent institutional infrastructures, CSR as corporate practice risks to become seen as nothing more than window-dressing.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - 29 May 2015
EventThe Canadian Academic Accounting Association Annual Conference 2015 - Hilton Toronto, Toronto, Canada
Duration: 28 May 201531 May 2015

Conference

ConferenceThe Canadian Academic Accounting Association Annual Conference 2015
CountryCanada
CityToronto
Period28/05/1531/05/15

Fingerprint

Tax
Transition economies
Corporate Social Responsibility
Institutional development
Market development
Social responsibility
Stakeholders
Stockholders
China
Corporate tax
Institutional infrastructure
Regional variation
Tax compliance
Window dressing

Cite this

CHENG, S., & LIN, K. Z. (2015). Corporate Social Responsibility and Tax Reporting Aggressiveness in a Transition Economy. The Canadian Academic Accounting Association Annual Conference 2015, Toronto, Canada.
CHENG, Suwina ; LIN, Kenny Z. / Corporate Social Responsibility and Tax Reporting Aggressiveness in a Transition Economy. The Canadian Academic Accounting Association Annual Conference 2015, Toronto, Canada.
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CHENG, S & LIN, KZ 2015, 'Corporate Social Responsibility and Tax Reporting Aggressiveness in a Transition Economy' The Canadian Academic Accounting Association Annual Conference 2015, Toronto, Canada, 28/05/15 - 31/05/15, .

Corporate Social Responsibility and Tax Reporting Aggressiveness in a Transition Economy. / CHENG, Suwina; LIN, Kenny Z.

2015. The Canadian Academic Accounting Association Annual Conference 2015, Toronto, Canada.

Research output: Other Conference ContributionsPresentationPresentation

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AU - LIN, Kenny Z.

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N2 - This paper examines the relationship between corporate social responsibility (CSR) and corporate tax in an environment where we expect this relation to be affected by the degree of market and institutional developments. Taking advantage of substantial cross regional variations in institutions in China, we find that in regions with a lower level of institutional development, firms claiming to act socially responsible engage more in aggressive tax reporting, consistent with the stockholder view of corporate social responsibility (CSR). In contrast, we find that in institutionally stronger regions, corporate social responsibility is more aligned with the social responsibility aspect of tax compliance, which supports the stakeholder view of CSR. Our results suggest that absent institutional infrastructures, CSR as corporate practice risks to become seen as nothing more than window-dressing.

AB - This paper examines the relationship between corporate social responsibility (CSR) and corporate tax in an environment where we expect this relation to be affected by the degree of market and institutional developments. Taking advantage of substantial cross regional variations in institutions in China, we find that in regions with a lower level of institutional development, firms claiming to act socially responsible engage more in aggressive tax reporting, consistent with the stockholder view of corporate social responsibility (CSR). In contrast, we find that in institutionally stronger regions, corporate social responsibility is more aligned with the social responsibility aspect of tax compliance, which supports the stakeholder view of CSR. Our results suggest that absent institutional infrastructures, CSR as corporate practice risks to become seen as nothing more than window-dressing.

M3 - Presentation

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CHENG S, LIN KZ. Corporate Social Responsibility and Tax Reporting Aggressiveness in a Transition Economy. 2015. The Canadian Academic Accounting Association Annual Conference 2015, Toronto, Canada.