Creative Digital Art: Young Children’s Video Making Through Practice-Based Learning

Suzannie K. Y. LEUNG*, Kimburley W. Y. CHOI, Mantak YUEN

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Book Chapters | Papers in Conference ProceedingsBook ChapterResearchpeer-review

Abstract

In the twenty-first century, digital play has become an inevitable experience for young children and an art form that aligns with the STEAM approach. Researchers in various countries have investigated how digital technologies relate to children’s learning experiences at school. This chapter describes the successful attempt to facilitate the production of video by nine children (aged five to eight years) during a two-day workshop in a government-subsidised university in Hong Kong. During the workshop, the children were taught (1) to use cinematic language (e.g., zoom-in and long take), (2) technical skills (e.g., the methods for operating a video camera) and (3) narrative skills (e.g., storyboard drawing). Through detailed guidance, practice-based questioning and a series of hands-on activities, the children were able to use film language to share their toy-playing stories and produce their own one-minute videos. The authors present the theoretical background to this exploratory study and share the implementation processes with teachers and parents. The teachers’ reflections on the design and implementation of the workshop are also discussed. In addition, suggestions are made about ways to support the digital play of toddlers and young children.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationEmbedding STEAM in Early Childhood Education and Care
EditorsCaroline COHRSSEN, Susanne GARVIS
PublisherSpringer International Publishing AG
Chapter3
Pages41-63
Number of pages23
ISBN (Electronic)9783030656249
ISBN (Print)9783030656232
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 29 May 2021
Externally publishedYes

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