Crossing the Boundary between Tradition and Abstraction: The Display of Lui Shuo Kwan’s Chinese Paintings in 1960s Britain

Research output: Other Conference ContributionsConference Paper (other)

Abstract

The study of modern Chinese painting had remained unexplored in Europe until the early 1930s. According to Laurence Binyon (1869–1943), Keeper of Oriental Prints and Drawings of the British Museum, European collectors and connoisseurs were more interested in the rare beauty and fastidious style of early Chinese art, but not the art of modern China. In the early 1930s, Liu Haisu (1896–1994), Director of the Academy of Fine Arts in Shanghai, was instrumental in introducing the aesthetic beauty and innovative styles of modern ink painting to Western audiences. In 1934, he toured a successful exhibition of modern Chinese painting in Berlin, and subsequently toured it in over ten European countries, including London in 1935. While the British Museum and the Ashmolean Museum enthusiastically enriched their collections of Chinese paintings in the second half of the twentieth century, other provincial museums in Britain also introduced the new subject to audiences through exhibitions.

This paper examines the roles of collector, art dealer, curator and scholar in promoting an appreciation and study of modern Chinese painting in 1960s Britain. It will lay emphasis on the 1967 exhibition of modern Chinese painting at the Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art in Edinburgh, in which Douglas Hall, Geoffrey Baker, Michael Sullivan and others contributed to the acquisition, display and interpretation of more than 50 exhibits by over 25 Chinese artists based in Hong Kong, mainland China and Taiwan. Special attention will be given to prominent artists, such as Lui Shou-kwan (1919–1975) and Fang Zhaoling (1914–2006), in order to reveal their reputation and participation in art exhibitions in Britain.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - 27 Sep 2014
EventThe First Conference of European Association for Asian Art and Archaeology - Palacký University, Olomouc, Czech Republic
Duration: 25 Sep 201427 Sep 2014
https://ea-aaa.eu/1st-eaaa-conference-olomouc/

Conference

ConferenceThe First Conference of European Association for Asian Art and Archaeology
Abbreviated titleThe 1st European Association for Asian Art and Archaeology (EAAA) Conference
CountryCzech Republic
CityOlomouc
Period25/09/1427/09/14
OtherThis conference is jointly organized by the EAAA and the Department of Asian Studies at Palacký University Olomouc. The conference is generously supported by Palacký University Olomouc, as the 8th conference of cultural anthropology of South and Eastern Asia.
Internet address

Fingerprint

1960s
Chinese Painting
British Museum
1930s
Collectors
Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art
Shanghai
Provincial Museum
Hong Kong
Art
Ashmolean Museum
Artist
Edinburgh
Mainland China
Art Exhibitions
Aesthetics
Ink Painting
Modern China
Chinese Art
Chinese Artist

Cite this

HUANG, Y. L. (2014). Crossing the Boundary between Tradition and Abstraction: The Display of Lui Shuo Kwan’s Chinese Paintings in 1960s Britain. Paper presented at The First Conference of European Association for Asian Art and Archaeology, Olomouc, Czech Republic.
HUANG, Ying Ling. / Crossing the Boundary between Tradition and Abstraction: The Display of Lui Shuo Kwan’s Chinese Paintings in 1960s Britain. Paper presented at The First Conference of European Association for Asian Art and Archaeology, Olomouc, Czech Republic.
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abstract = "The study of modern Chinese painting had remained unexplored in Europe until the early 1930s. According to Laurence Binyon (1869–1943), Keeper of Oriental Prints and Drawings of the British Museum, European collectors and connoisseurs were more interested in the rare beauty and fastidious style of early Chinese art, but not the art of modern China. In the early 1930s, Liu Haisu (1896–1994), Director of the Academy of Fine Arts in Shanghai, was instrumental in introducing the aesthetic beauty and innovative styles of modern ink painting to Western audiences. In 1934, he toured a successful exhibition of modern Chinese painting in Berlin, and subsequently toured it in over ten European countries, including London in 1935. While the British Museum and the Ashmolean Museum enthusiastically enriched their collections of Chinese paintings in the second half of the twentieth century, other provincial museums in Britain also introduced the new subject to audiences through exhibitions.This paper examines the roles of collector, art dealer, curator and scholar in promoting an appreciation and study of modern Chinese painting in 1960s Britain. It will lay emphasis on the 1967 exhibition of modern Chinese painting at the Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art in Edinburgh, in which Douglas Hall, Geoffrey Baker, Michael Sullivan and others contributed to the acquisition, display and interpretation of more than 50 exhibits by over 25 Chinese artists based in Hong Kong, mainland China and Taiwan. Special attention will be given to prominent artists, such as Lui Shou-kwan (1919–1975) and Fang Zhaoling (1914–2006), in order to reveal their reputation and participation in art exhibitions in Britain.",
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HUANG, YL 2014, 'Crossing the Boundary between Tradition and Abstraction: The Display of Lui Shuo Kwan’s Chinese Paintings in 1960s Britain', Paper presented at The First Conference of European Association for Asian Art and Archaeology, Olomouc, Czech Republic, 25/09/14 - 27/09/14.

Crossing the Boundary between Tradition and Abstraction: The Display of Lui Shuo Kwan’s Chinese Paintings in 1960s Britain. / HUANG, Ying Ling.

2014. Paper presented at The First Conference of European Association for Asian Art and Archaeology, Olomouc, Czech Republic.

Research output: Other Conference ContributionsConference Paper (other)

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T1 - Crossing the Boundary between Tradition and Abstraction: The Display of Lui Shuo Kwan’s Chinese Paintings in 1960s Britain

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PY - 2014/9/27

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N2 - The study of modern Chinese painting had remained unexplored in Europe until the early 1930s. According to Laurence Binyon (1869–1943), Keeper of Oriental Prints and Drawings of the British Museum, European collectors and connoisseurs were more interested in the rare beauty and fastidious style of early Chinese art, but not the art of modern China. In the early 1930s, Liu Haisu (1896–1994), Director of the Academy of Fine Arts in Shanghai, was instrumental in introducing the aesthetic beauty and innovative styles of modern ink painting to Western audiences. In 1934, he toured a successful exhibition of modern Chinese painting in Berlin, and subsequently toured it in over ten European countries, including London in 1935. While the British Museum and the Ashmolean Museum enthusiastically enriched their collections of Chinese paintings in the second half of the twentieth century, other provincial museums in Britain also introduced the new subject to audiences through exhibitions.This paper examines the roles of collector, art dealer, curator and scholar in promoting an appreciation and study of modern Chinese painting in 1960s Britain. It will lay emphasis on the 1967 exhibition of modern Chinese painting at the Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art in Edinburgh, in which Douglas Hall, Geoffrey Baker, Michael Sullivan and others contributed to the acquisition, display and interpretation of more than 50 exhibits by over 25 Chinese artists based in Hong Kong, mainland China and Taiwan. Special attention will be given to prominent artists, such as Lui Shou-kwan (1919–1975) and Fang Zhaoling (1914–2006), in order to reveal their reputation and participation in art exhibitions in Britain.

AB - The study of modern Chinese painting had remained unexplored in Europe until the early 1930s. According to Laurence Binyon (1869–1943), Keeper of Oriental Prints and Drawings of the British Museum, European collectors and connoisseurs were more interested in the rare beauty and fastidious style of early Chinese art, but not the art of modern China. In the early 1930s, Liu Haisu (1896–1994), Director of the Academy of Fine Arts in Shanghai, was instrumental in introducing the aesthetic beauty and innovative styles of modern ink painting to Western audiences. In 1934, he toured a successful exhibition of modern Chinese painting in Berlin, and subsequently toured it in over ten European countries, including London in 1935. While the British Museum and the Ashmolean Museum enthusiastically enriched their collections of Chinese paintings in the second half of the twentieth century, other provincial museums in Britain also introduced the new subject to audiences through exhibitions.This paper examines the roles of collector, art dealer, curator and scholar in promoting an appreciation and study of modern Chinese painting in 1960s Britain. It will lay emphasis on the 1967 exhibition of modern Chinese painting at the Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art in Edinburgh, in which Douglas Hall, Geoffrey Baker, Michael Sullivan and others contributed to the acquisition, display and interpretation of more than 50 exhibits by over 25 Chinese artists based in Hong Kong, mainland China and Taiwan. Special attention will be given to prominent artists, such as Lui Shou-kwan (1919–1975) and Fang Zhaoling (1914–2006), in order to reveal their reputation and participation in art exhibitions in Britain.

M3 - Conference Paper (other)

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HUANG YL. Crossing the Boundary between Tradition and Abstraction: The Display of Lui Shuo Kwan’s Chinese Paintings in 1960s Britain. 2014. Paper presented at The First Conference of European Association for Asian Art and Archaeology, Olomouc, Czech Republic.