Defining Journalists in Late-Nineteenth Century Britain

Research output: Journal PublicationsJournal Article (refereed)Researchpeer-review

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This article uses journalists’ memoirs, professional publications, and handbooks to show how British journalists projected images of themselves in the late nineteenth century. In a period of professional and social insecurity, journalists employed such self-presentations as a way of legitimizing their “title to be heard” in the public sphere. Rather than demand that journalism be converted into a closed profession comparable to law or medicine, journalists presented theirs as an “open profession” in which ability and hard work automatically led to success. Although such self-projections legitimized the status of elite journalists, they hampered attempts to improve journalists’ working conditions.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)138 - 155
Number of pages18
JournalCritical Studies in Media Communication
Volume22
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2005
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Journalists
Nineteenth-century Britain
Handbook
Working Conditions
Public Sphere
Elites
Self-presentation
Journalism
Medicine
Memoir

Bibliographical note

This article was originally presented at the Middle Atlantic Conference on British Studies and the North American Conference on British Studies.

Keywords

  • Britain, Journalists
  • Nineteenth Century
  • Autobiography
  • Professionalization

Cite this

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Defining Journalists in Late-Nineteenth Century Britain. / HAMPTON, Mark Andrew.

In: Critical Studies in Media Communication, Vol. 22, No. 2, 06.2005, p. 138 - 155.

Research output: Journal PublicationsJournal Article (refereed)Researchpeer-review

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