DNA evidence for the hybridization of wild turtles in Taiwan : possible genetic pollution from trade animals

Jonathan J. FONG, Tien-Hsi CHEN

Research output: Journal PublicationsJournal Article (refereed)

28 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Field surveys in Taiwan have uncovered turtles presumed to be hybrids based on their intermediate morphology. We sequenced a mitochondrial (ND4) and nuclear (R35) gene of two putative hybrid individuals, along with representatives of the potential parental species ( Mauremys mutica , M. reevesii , M. sinensis ), to determine their genetic identity. Based on our data, both individuals are hybrids, with independent, recent origins resulting from the mating of a female M. reevesii and a male M. sinensis . Since we question whether the highly traded M. reevesii is endemic to Taiwan, this hybridization could represent human-mediated genetic pollution. We also discuss the implications of our findings on turtle conservation in Taiwan.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2061-2066
Number of pages6
JournalConservation Genetics
Volume11
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Oct 2010
Externally publishedYes

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Turtles
Taiwan
turtle
turtles
hybridization
pollution
DNA
Chinemys reevesii
animals
Medical Genetics
Pedigree
field survey
gene
Genes
animal trade
genes

Cite this

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DNA evidence for the hybridization of wild turtles in Taiwan : possible genetic pollution from trade animals. / FONG, Jonathan J.; CHEN, Tien-Hsi.

In: Conservation Genetics, Vol. 11, No. 5, 01.10.2010, p. 2061-2066.

Research output: Journal PublicationsJournal Article (refereed)

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