Do we know when our impressions of others are valid? evidence for realistic accuracy awareness in first impressions of personality

Jeremy C. BIESANZ, Lauren J. HUMAN, Annie Claude PAQUIN, Meanne CHAN, Kate L. PARISOTTO, Juliet SARRACINO, Randall L. GILLIS

Research output: Journal PublicationsJournal Article (refereed)

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Do people have insight into the validity of their first impressions or accuracy awareness? Across two large interactive round-robins, those who reported having formed a more accurate impression of a specific target had (a) a more distinctive realistically accurate impression, accurately perceiving the target's unique personality characteristics as described by the target's self-, parent-, and peer-reports, and (b) a more normatively accurate impression, perceiving the target to be similar to what people generally tend to be like. Specifically, if a perceiver reported forming a more valid impression of a specific target, he or she had in fact formed a more realistically accurate impression of that target for all but the highest impression validity levels. In contrast, people who generally reported more valid impressions were not actually more accurate in general. In sum, people are aware of when and for whom their first impressions are more realistically accurate.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)452-459
Number of pages8
JournalSocial Psychological and Personality Science
Volume2
Issue number5
Early online date19 Jan 2011
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Sep 2011
Externally publishedYes

Bibliographical note

This research was partially supported by Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada Grants SSHRC 410-2005-2287 and 410-2008-2643 to Jeremy C. Biesanz.

Keywords

  • Hierarchical linear modeling/multilevel modeling
  • Impression formation
  • Person perception
  • Personality
  • Social interaction

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