Employees' well-being in Greater China : the direct and moderating effects of general self-efficacy

Oi Ling SIU, Chang-qin LU, Paul E. SPECTOR

Research output: Journal PublicationsJournal Article (refereed)Researchpeer-review

55 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study investigated the direct and moderating effect of general self-efficacy on the relationship between stressors and well-being in Chinese societies. Survey data were collected from 386 and 306 employees in Hong Kong and Beijing, respectively. The results consistently showed that general self-efficacy was positively related to mental well-being and physical well-being. A series of hierarchical regressions revealed that general self-efficacy moderated the relationship between stressors and mental well-being, yet did not moderate the relationship between stressors and physical well-being. Results verified that general self-efficacy plays an important role in employees’ well-being in the collectivist society of China.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)288-301
Number of pages14
JournalApplied Psychology: An International Review
Volume56
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Apr 2007

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Self Efficacy
China
Hong Kong
Employees
Self-efficacy
Well-being

Cite this

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Employees' well-being in Greater China : the direct and moderating effects of general self-efficacy. / SIU, Oi Ling; LU, Chang-qin; SPECTOR, Paul E.

In: Applied Psychology: An International Review, Vol. 56, No. 2, 01.04.2007, p. 288-301.

Research output: Journal PublicationsJournal Article (refereed)Researchpeer-review

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