Establishing reputation : exhibitions of prominent Chinese painters in Britain, 1935-1980

Research output: Other Conference ContributionsConference Paper (other)Other Conference Paperpeer-review

Abstract

In the early 1930s, artists, scholars and diplomats from China introduced the new subject of modern Chinese painting to British audiences through travelling exhibitions. The pioneering Exhibition of Modern Chinese Painting, held under the auspices of the China Association and the China Society, at the New Burlington Galleries in London in 1935, gave the British public a first glimpse of the development of Chinese painting in Republican China. Between 1943 and 1945, another Exhibition of Modern Chinese Paintings organised by the British Council in collaboration with the Chinese Ministry of Information, further promoted appreciation of twentieth-century Chinese painting amongst wider audiences throughout Britain. Just as private collectors were attracted to expand their collections with modern Chinese art, galleries and museums in England became more enthusiastic about acquiring and exhibiting works by notable Chinese painters in the 1950s and subsequent decades. This paper throws light on the early history of exhibiting modern Chinese painting in Britain. It examines the role of governments, museums and galleries in promoting an appreciation and study of this new subject between 1935 and 1980. Using data analysis of exhibitions of prominent Chinese painters, including Qi Baishi (1864-1957), Zhang Daqian (1899-1983), Fu Baoshi (1904- 1965), Fang Zhaoling (1914-2006) and Lui Shou Kwan (1919-1975), I will investigate the contribution of individual curators, gallerists, dealers and scholars in establishing the reputation of twentieth-century Chinese artists through exhibitions and publications.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - 28 Oct 2016
EventChinese Painting since 1900: Scholarship, Exhibitions and Collections - University of Oxford, China Centre, Oxford, United Kingdom
Duration: 26 Oct 201628 Oct 2016

Conference

ConferenceChinese Painting since 1900: Scholarship, Exhibitions and Collections
CountryUnited Kingdom
CityOxford
Period26/10/1628/10/16
OtherAshmolean Museum of Art and Archaeology, University of Oxford

Fingerprint

Chinese Painter
Chinese Painting
China
Gallerist
Artist
Diplomats
Government
Burlington
1950s
1930s
Dealers
Chinese Art
Collectors
Republican
British Council
Chinese Artist
Early History
Qi Baishi
Ministry
England

Cite this

HUANG, Y. L. M. (2016). Establishing reputation : exhibitions of prominent Chinese painters in Britain, 1935-1980. Paper presented at Chinese Painting since 1900: Scholarship, Exhibitions and Collections, Oxford, United Kingdom.
HUANG, Ying Ling, Michelle. / Establishing reputation : exhibitions of prominent Chinese painters in Britain, 1935-1980. Paper presented at Chinese Painting since 1900: Scholarship, Exhibitions and Collections, Oxford, United Kingdom.
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HUANG, YLM 2016, 'Establishing reputation : exhibitions of prominent Chinese painters in Britain, 1935-1980' Paper presented at Chinese Painting since 1900: Scholarship, Exhibitions and Collections, Oxford, United Kingdom, 26/10/16 - 28/10/16, .

Establishing reputation : exhibitions of prominent Chinese painters in Britain, 1935-1980. / HUANG, Ying Ling, Michelle.

2016. Paper presented at Chinese Painting since 1900: Scholarship, Exhibitions and Collections, Oxford, United Kingdom.

Research output: Other Conference ContributionsConference Paper (other)Other Conference Paperpeer-review

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HUANG YLM. Establishing reputation : exhibitions of prominent Chinese painters in Britain, 1935-1980. 2016. Paper presented at Chinese Painting since 1900: Scholarship, Exhibitions and Collections, Oxford, United Kingdom.