Executive functioning and rumination in predicting depression among children: A longitudinal study

Research output: Other Conference ContributionsConference Paper (other)Researchpeer-review

Abstract

Objectives: Theoretical models and empirical studies of depression have predominately focused on the main effects of various predictors such as rumination and overlooked potential moderating processes. This study examined the moderating role of executive functioning in the relationship between rumination and depression in children.
Methods: One hundred and twenty-two children (39.3% female) aged from 9 to 14 (M = 12.16, SD = 1.38) completed the Depression Anxiety Stress Scales, Rumination Response Scale, and some Stroop Interference tests as a measure of executive functioning. The children completed the depression measure again at one-year follow-up.
Results: A moderated regression analysis showed that executive functioning significantly moderated the prospective relationship between rumination and depression while controlling for age, gender, and baseline depression, such that the association between rumination and depression was weaker when executive functioning was higher.
Conclusion: Our findings indicate that high executive functioning may serve as a protective factor that buffers the negative effects of rumination on depression, suggesting that executive functioning training may help ruminators reduce depressive symptoms.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - 2 Dec 2020
Event24th World Congress of the International Association for Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Allied Professions - Virtual, Singapore
Duration: 2 Dec 20204 Dec 2020
https://www.iacapap2020.org/

Conference

Conference24th World Congress of the International Association for Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Allied Professions
Abbreviated titleIACAPAP 2020
CountrySingapore
Period2/12/204/12/20
Internet address

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