Explaining Attitudes toward Executive Pay: Evidence from a Survey Experiment

Esra BURAK, Erin CUMBERWORTH

Research output: Journal PublicationsJournal Article (refereed)

Abstract

This paper examines the effects of several factors, including performance, on attitudes toward high executive pay. We ask: would people agree on whether a CEO’s pay is too high or too low, fair or unfair, and right or wrong, if they could be more certain than typically possible regarding a CEO’s relevant contributions? Using data from a population-based survey experiment (N = 1,170), we find that the effects of a CEO’s inputs are small next to the effects of predispositions (e.g. core values people bring to the issue), with implications for how pay at the top is justified.
Original languageEnglish
Number of pages25
JournalSociological Quarterly
Early online date5 Feb 2020
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 5 Feb 2020

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experiment
evidence
performance
Values

Bibliographical note

This research was fully supported by an Early Career Scheme (ECS) grant from the Research Grants Council of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, China [Funding Reference No: LU 23601615].

Keywords

  • Income inequality
  • attitudes
  • distributive justice

Cite this

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title = "Explaining Attitudes toward Executive Pay: Evidence from a Survey Experiment",
abstract = "This paper examines the effects of several factors, including performance, on attitudes toward high executive pay. We ask: would people agree on whether a CEO’s pay is too high or too low, fair or unfair, and right or wrong, if they could be more certain than typically possible regarding a CEO’s relevant contributions? Using data from a population-based survey experiment (N = 1,170), we find that the effects of a CEO’s inputs are small next to the effects of predispositions (e.g. core values people bring to the issue), with implications for how pay at the top is justified.",
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Explaining Attitudes toward Executive Pay: Evidence from a Survey Experiment. / BURAK, Esra; CUMBERWORTH, Erin.

In: Sociological Quarterly, 05.02.2020.

Research output: Journal PublicationsJournal Article (refereed)

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AU - CUMBERWORTH, Erin

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