Family Social Capital as a ‘Safety Net’ For Adolescents’ Well-Being: Lessons for Ghana’s Child and Family Welfare Policy

Research output: Other PublicationsOther ArticleCommunication

Abstract

The notion that the measurement of subjective well-being is key to social policy development has been increasingly acknowledged. Indicators that encapsulate people’s overall mental health and cognitive evaluations of their own lives have expounded a vital aspect of the well-being concept that can be applied to social policies when amassed at the aggregate population level. Crucially, the resulting new policy paradigm has also included a broad move beyond objective measures of young people’s well-being by involving them to explain issues that matter to their well-being in their own voices. In turn, social indicators of quality of life and embracing social determinants of health have more readily been advanced to shape youth policies worldwide.
Original languageEnglish
Specialist publicationThe Social Policy Blog
Publication statusPublished - 6 Jun 2022

Bibliographical note

This blog is based on an article in the Journal of Social Policy by Evelyn Aboagye Addae and Stefan Kühner

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