From planned communities to deregulated spaces : social and tenurial change in high quality state housing

Patricia KENNETT, Ray FORREST

Research output: Journal PublicationsJournal Article (refereed)

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper explores social and tenurial change on two estates of high quality state housing in the south of England. In doing so it offers a corrective to dominant contemporary perceptions of state housing as stigmatised policy failures and engages with wider debates about social change and tenure diversification. The paper argues that while tenurial distinctions are evident they are less significant than might be assumed from contemporary debates. Residents are as likely to construct narratives of neighbourhood change around life course and lifestyle as around the growth of home ownership. The paper also offers a further contribution to literature which has tracked the social consequences of privatisation policies in the state housing sector in Britain. The research involved unstructured interviews with 50 residents and key actors on the two estates which were examples of early British post-war state housing. Using administrative files, tenants and owners were drawn from different time periods, including both original and new residents. The research also involved archival work and a postal survey.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)47-63
Number of pages17
JournalHousing Studies
Volume18
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2003
Externally publishedYes

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social space
housing
resident
community
social change
privatization
lifestyle
diversification
social effects
ownership
narrative
interview
policy

Cite this

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From planned communities to deregulated spaces : social and tenurial change in high quality state housing. / KENNETT, Patricia; FORREST, Ray.

In: Housing Studies, Vol. 18, No. 1, 01.01.2003, p. 47-63.

Research output: Journal PublicationsJournal Article (refereed)

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