Gender, self-rated health and functional decline among community-dwelling older adults

Razak M. GYASI*, David R. PHILLIPS

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Journal PublicationsJournal Article (refereed)Researchpeer-review

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: This paper examines the association between self-rated health (SRH) and functional decline (FD) in older Ghanaian cohorts and investigates whether the effect differs by gender and also modified by marital status. Methods: The study used cross-sectional survey data (N = 1200) from an Aging, Health, Psychological Wellbeing and Health-seeking Behavior Study (AHPWHB) study conducted in between August 2016 and January 2017. A four-level gendered-stratified logit modeling estimated the SRH-FD association and the interaction terms. Results: Overall, 23% of male respondents and 34% of women revealed significant FD (p < 0.001). The fully-adjusted model showed that SRH status was a strong predictor of FD across genders but the effect was most pronounced among men. Compared with excellent/very good SRH, fair and poor SRH (β = 0.160; p < 0.05) and (β = 1.700; p < 0.001) for women and (β = 2.202; p < 0.001) and (β= 2.356; p < 0.001) for men respectively were significantly associated with increased FD. However, good (β = − 1.760; p < 0.001), fair (β = − 2.800; p < 0.001) and poor SRH (β = −2.088; p < 0.001) decreased FD if an older woman was married compared with unmarried women with excellent/very good SRH. Conclusion: The strength of SRH-FDs association largely differed with gender and also moderated by marital status for women. Improving the SRH and marital quality could be protective of functional abilities, independence and quality of life for older people.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)174-183
Number of pages10
JournalArchives of Gerontology and Geriatrics
Volume77
Early online date16 May 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jul 2018

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Independent Living
gender
Health
health
community
Marital Status
marital status
Health Fairs
Aptitude
study behavior
Health Status
health status
wife
Cross-Sectional Studies
quality of life
Quality of Life
Psychology

Keywords

  • Functional declines
  • Gender
  • Health- and social-care policy
  • Instrumental activities of daily living
  • Marital status
  • Self-rated health

Cite this

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title = "Gender, self-rated health and functional decline among community-dwelling older adults",
abstract = "Objective: This paper examines the association between self-rated health (SRH) and functional decline (FD) in older Ghanaian cohorts and investigates whether the effect differs by gender and also modified by marital status. Methods: The study used cross-sectional survey data (N = 1200) from an Aging, Health, Psychological Wellbeing and Health-seeking Behavior Study (AHPWHB) study conducted in between August 2016 and January 2017. A four-level gendered-stratified logit modeling estimated the SRH-FD association and the interaction terms. Results: Overall, 23{\%} of male respondents and 34{\%} of women revealed significant FD (p < 0.001). The fully-adjusted model showed that SRH status was a strong predictor of FD across genders but the effect was most pronounced among men. Compared with excellent/very good SRH, fair and poor SRH (β = 0.160; p < 0.05) and (β = 1.700; p < 0.001) for women and (β = 2.202; p < 0.001) and (β= 2.356; p < 0.001) for men respectively were significantly associated with increased FD. However, good (β = − 1.760; p < 0.001), fair (β = − 2.800; p < 0.001) and poor SRH (β = −2.088; p < 0.001) decreased FD if an older woman was married compared with unmarried women with excellent/very good SRH. Conclusion: The strength of SRH-FDs association largely differed with gender and also moderated by marital status for women. Improving the SRH and marital quality could be protective of functional abilities, independence and quality of life for older people.",
keywords = "Functional declines, Gender, Health- and social-care policy, Instrumental activities of daily living, Marital status, Self-rated health",
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Gender, self-rated health and functional decline among community-dwelling older adults. / GYASI, Razak M.; PHILLIPS, David R.

In: Archives of Gerontology and Geriatrics, Vol. 77, 01.07.2018, p. 174-183.

Research output: Journal PublicationsJournal Article (refereed)Researchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Gender, self-rated health and functional decline among community-dwelling older adults

AU - GYASI, Razak M.

AU - PHILLIPS, David R.

PY - 2018/7/1

Y1 - 2018/7/1

N2 - Objective: This paper examines the association between self-rated health (SRH) and functional decline (FD) in older Ghanaian cohorts and investigates whether the effect differs by gender and also modified by marital status. Methods: The study used cross-sectional survey data (N = 1200) from an Aging, Health, Psychological Wellbeing and Health-seeking Behavior Study (AHPWHB) study conducted in between August 2016 and January 2017. A four-level gendered-stratified logit modeling estimated the SRH-FD association and the interaction terms. Results: Overall, 23% of male respondents and 34% of women revealed significant FD (p < 0.001). The fully-adjusted model showed that SRH status was a strong predictor of FD across genders but the effect was most pronounced among men. Compared with excellent/very good SRH, fair and poor SRH (β = 0.160; p < 0.05) and (β = 1.700; p < 0.001) for women and (β = 2.202; p < 0.001) and (β= 2.356; p < 0.001) for men respectively were significantly associated with increased FD. However, good (β = − 1.760; p < 0.001), fair (β = − 2.800; p < 0.001) and poor SRH (β = −2.088; p < 0.001) decreased FD if an older woman was married compared with unmarried women with excellent/very good SRH. Conclusion: The strength of SRH-FDs association largely differed with gender and also moderated by marital status for women. Improving the SRH and marital quality could be protective of functional abilities, independence and quality of life for older people.

AB - Objective: This paper examines the association between self-rated health (SRH) and functional decline (FD) in older Ghanaian cohorts and investigates whether the effect differs by gender and also modified by marital status. Methods: The study used cross-sectional survey data (N = 1200) from an Aging, Health, Psychological Wellbeing and Health-seeking Behavior Study (AHPWHB) study conducted in between August 2016 and January 2017. A four-level gendered-stratified logit modeling estimated the SRH-FD association and the interaction terms. Results: Overall, 23% of male respondents and 34% of women revealed significant FD (p < 0.001). The fully-adjusted model showed that SRH status was a strong predictor of FD across genders but the effect was most pronounced among men. Compared with excellent/very good SRH, fair and poor SRH (β = 0.160; p < 0.05) and (β = 1.700; p < 0.001) for women and (β = 2.202; p < 0.001) and (β= 2.356; p < 0.001) for men respectively were significantly associated with increased FD. However, good (β = − 1.760; p < 0.001), fair (β = − 2.800; p < 0.001) and poor SRH (β = −2.088; p < 0.001) decreased FD if an older woman was married compared with unmarried women with excellent/very good SRH. Conclusion: The strength of SRH-FDs association largely differed with gender and also moderated by marital status for women. Improving the SRH and marital quality could be protective of functional abilities, independence and quality of life for older people.

KW - Functional declines

KW - Gender

KW - Health- and social-care policy

KW - Instrumental activities of daily living

KW - Marital status

KW - Self-rated health

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U2 - 10.1016/j.archger.2018.05.010

DO - 10.1016/j.archger.2018.05.010

M3 - Journal Article (refereed)

VL - 77

SP - 174

EP - 183

JO - Archives of Gerontology and Geriatrics

JF - Archives of Gerontology and Geriatrics

SN - 0167-4943

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