Ghanaian couples’ perceptions and attitudes towards women’s participation in family fishery decisions and practices

Moses ADJEI, Charity ARTHUR

Research output: Journal PublicationsJournal Article (refereed)peer-review

Abstract

In the last few decades, there has been growing scholarly interest about the implications of women’s increased economic role on household decision-making dynamics. Contributing to these conversations, the current paper examines couples (wives and husbands) perceptions and attitudes towards women’s decision-making power in the context of Ghana’s small-scale fishery where both couples engage in the same economic activity, performing different, but complementary roles. The study involved interviews with 20 and 18 married female and male fisherfolk respectively, which was part of a larger study by the first author among fisherfolk in the south-western coast of Ghana. We show that accounts of perceived decision-making power of women varied by spouse. Using a gender lens, we show how both women and men discursively reproduced and challenged hegemonic gender discourses and relations in different contexts. We argue that exploring the gaps in couples’ account of women’s household decision-making power as well as their perceptions and attitudes towards such roles provides important ground to understanding the inconsistencies in the outcomes of programs targeted at women empowerment and gender equality.
Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Comparative Family Studies
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 6 May 2022

Keywords

  • small-scale fishery
  • women’s decision-making
  • couples’ perceptions
  • Ghana

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