Guilt by statistical association : revisiting the prosecutor’s fallacy and the interrogator’s fallacy

Neven SESARDIC

Research output: Journal PublicationsJournal Article (refereed)

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The article focuses on prosecutor's fallacy and interrogator's fallacy, the two kinds of reasoning in inferring a suspect's guilt. The prosecutor's fallacy is a combination of two conditional probabilities that lead to unfortunate commission of error in the process due to the inclination of the prosecutor in the establishment of strong evidence that will indict the defendant. It provides a comprehensive discussion of Gerd Gigerenzer's discourse on a criminal case in Germany explaining the perils of prosecutor's fallacy in his application of probability to practical problems. It also discusses the interrogator's fallacy which was introduced by Robert A. J. Matthews as the error on the assumption that confessional evidence can never reduce the probability of guilt.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)320-332
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Philosophy
Volume105
Issue number6
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jun 2008

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Fallacies
Guilt
Discourse
Inclination
Perils
Conditional Probability
Germany

Cite this

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Guilt by statistical association : revisiting the prosecutor’s fallacy and the interrogator’s fallacy. / SESARDIC, Neven.

In: Journal of Philosophy, Vol. 105, No. 6, 01.06.2008, p. 320-332.

Research output: Journal PublicationsJournal Article (refereed)

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