Hannah Arendt, Totalitarianism and the social sciences

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Abstract

This book examines the nature of totalitarianism as interpreted by some of the finest minds of the twentieth century. It focuses on Hannah Arendt's claim that totalitarianism was an entirely unprecedented regime and that the social sciences had integrally misconstrued it. A sociologist who is a critical admirer of Arendt, Baehr looks sympathetically at Arendt's objections to social science and shows that her complaints were in many respects justified. Avoiding broad disciplinary endorsements or dismissals, Baehr reconstructs the theoretical and political stakes of Arendt's encounters with prominent social scientists such as David Riesman, Raymond Aron, and Jules Monnerot. In presenting the first systematic appraisal of Arendt's critique of the social sciences, Baehr examines what it means to see an event as unprecedented. Furthermore, he adapts Arendt and Aron's philosophies to shed light on modern Islamist terrorism and to ask whether it should be categorized alongside Stalinism and National Socialism as totalitarian.
Original languageEnglish
Place of PublicationStanford
PublisherStanford University Press
Number of pages231
ISBN (Print)9780804756501
Publication statusPublished - 2010

Fingerprint

Totalitarianism
Social Sciences
Hannah Arendt
National Socialism
Complaints
Islamists
Stakes
Sociologists
Totalitarian
Terrorism
Raymond Aron
Philosophy
Stalinism

Cite this

BAEHR, P. (2010). Hannah Arendt, Totalitarianism and the social sciences. Stanford: Stanford University Press.
BAEHR, Peter. / Hannah Arendt, Totalitarianism and the social sciences. Stanford : Stanford University Press, 2010. 231 p.
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BAEHR, P 2010, Hannah Arendt, Totalitarianism and the social sciences. Stanford University Press, Stanford.

Hannah Arendt, Totalitarianism and the social sciences. / BAEHR, Peter.

Stanford : Stanford University Press, 2010. 231 p.

Research output: Scholarly Books | Reports | Literary WorksBook (Author)Research

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BAEHR P. Hannah Arendt, Totalitarianism and the social sciences. Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2010. 231 p.