Home as a site of resistance/repression? The intersection of family, politics and the Hong Kong 2019 protest movement

Ruby Y. S. LAI*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Journal PublicationsJournal Article (refereed)peer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This article illuminates the mutually constitutive nature of activism and family life in the context of a high-risk protest movement, by focusing on the 2019 Anti-Extradition Bill Movement in Hong Kong. Drawing on data collected through in-depth interviews with individuals who participated in the 2019 Movement, this article captures how politics penetrated individuals’ private lives through everyday family practices, and depicts the ways in which the protest movement undermined or fostered family cohesion. The findings illustrate the heterogeneity of family political interactions during political upheaval: while families were often sites of conflict and repression, which amplified political dissonance and reinforced hegemonic power relations within the domestic sphere, they could also become spaces of activism where individuals exchange political ideas and muster resources for collective actions. This study bridges the literature of family and social movement, by demonstrating how family lives and political participation are interwoven, and simultaneously structure protest participants’ biographical and social movement trajectories.
Original languageEnglish
JournalThe Sociological Review
Early online date17 May 2023
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 17 May 2023

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
The project was supported by the Faculty Research Grant sponsored by the author’s affiliated institution and the RGC Postdoctoral fellowship award (LU PDFS2021-3H01) from the Research Grants Council of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, China.

Publisher Copyright:
© The Author(s) 2023.

Keywords

  • Anti-Extradition Bill Movement
  • Hong Kong
  • family
  • political polarisation
  • social movement

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