Hong Kong skateboarding and network capital

Research output: Journal PublicationsJournal Article (refereed)Researchpeer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The importance of East Asia to the skateboard industry is multifaceted. It represents a dense commercial asset where the “cool” of skateboarding can be leveraged for consumption. It is also a global resource for touring professional skateboarders visiting countries such as China, Korea, and Japan to film and photograph their tricks in new locations. The success of such strategies are entwined with a regional network of skateboarders, a group whose subcultural capital is operationalized through network capital. Analysis of these connections highlights that Hong Kong’s prominence in East Asian skateboarding is largely dependent on its position as a global city and hybrid entrepôt. By addressing the conservative culture of skateboarding, and the importance of Hong Kong as a global city rather than a “skateable” city, this article further contributes to the theorizing of skateboarding beyond discussions of space and resistance.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)419-436
Number of pages18
JournalJournal of Sport and Social Issues
Volume42
Issue number6
Early online date24 Aug 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2018

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Keywords

  • Hong Kong
  • network capital
  • skateboarding

Cite this

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Hong Kong skateboarding and network capital. / O'CONNOR, Paul James.

In: Journal of Sport and Social Issues, Vol. 42, No. 6, 12.2018, p. 419-436.

Research output: Journal PublicationsJournal Article (refereed)Researchpeer-review

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