How are employers represented in and affected by the policymaking of in-work benefits? Policy stakeholders’ views in Hong Kong

Tat Chor AU-YEUNG*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Journal PublicationsJournal Article (refereed)peer-review

Abstract

Based on an employer-focused political economy framework, this qualitative study investigates how employers are represented in and affected by the policymaking of in-work benefits (IWBs), given employers’ political status and labour market conditions. Respondents addressed the importance of employers’ tacit support of the wage subsidies funded by the government. Arguably, it was considered that IWBs did not have a direct impact on wages, but they subsidised employers as a constraint against the minimum wage, boosted the workforce’s availability, and reduced recruitment costs for employers. This research substantiates the understanding of IWBs by integrating the perspectives of policy stakeholders and expands IWBs’ case studies in an authoritarian context.
Original languageEnglish
Number of pages20
JournalJournal of Poverty and Social Justice
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 5 May 2022

Bibliographical note

The author is grateful to all participants of this study. Thanks also go to Dr Nathalia E De Freitas for her inspirations.

Keywords

  • in-work benefits
  • employers
  • wage subsidies
  • labour market
  • in-work poverty

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