How internationalization at home through digitalization subverts the traditional classroom and creates students-as-producers: A case study of a law course in Hong Kong

Yim Hung Angel FAN, Angela DALY*, Natasha PUSHKARNA*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Book Chapters | Papers in Conference ProceedingsBook ChapterResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Through the case study of a Chinese University of Hong Kong undergraduate law class, this chapter demonstrates how Internationalization at Home can be achieved through a number of means, including: Utilizing an intercultural and international student body, their experience and knowledge; the use of digital tools to facilitate peer interactions and the co-creation of knowledge; course content which reflects an internationalized approach to the subject-matter of the course; and partnerships with external partners and organizations being incorporated into the course. Using a mixed methods approach, our case study demonstrates the successful use of all of these means to achieve a highly Internationalized-at-Home course which equipped students with important practical skills in an intercultural learning environment.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationInternationalisation at Home : A Collection of Pedagogical Approaches to Develop Students' Intercultural Competences
EditorsCécilia BRASSIER-RODRIGUES, Pascal BRASSIER
PublisherPeter Lang
Chapter4
Pages117-156
Edition1
ISBN (Print)9782807619005
Publication statusPublished - 14 Sep 2021
Externally publishedYes

Publication series

NameExploration
PublisherPeter Lang
Volume194
ISSN (Electronic)0721-3700

Keywords

  • Internationalization at home
  • Internationalisation of higher education
  • curriculum internationalisation
  • curriculum design
  • Teaching and learning strategies
  • teaching and research
  • Higher education
  • Digitalisation
  • student as producer
  • Case study

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