Impulsivity, life stress, refusal efficacy, and problem gambling among Chinese : testing the diathesis-stress-coping model

So Kum, Catherine TANG, Zhiren CHUA, Anise M. S. WU

Research output: Journal PublicationsJournal Article (refereed)Researchpeer-review

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study extended the diathesis-stress-coping model (Lazarus and Folkman, 1984) to understand problem gambling in Chinese societies. We examined core model components of impulsivity trait (diathesis), life stress, and gambling refusal efficacy (coping efficacy) with 942 Chinese college students and 153 Chinese gamblers. Results showed that the three core model components exerted main effects on problem gambling for both samples. Among college students, refusal efficacy interacted with impulsivity to influence problem gambling in male and female students, and interacted with life stress in male students only. In particular, more severe problem gambling was associated with higher impulsivity in low- but not high-efficacy students, and with higher stress in low- but not high-efficacy male students. Among gamblers, impulsivity interacted with life stress to influence problem gambling. In the high stress condition, high- relative to low-impulsivity gamblers reported more severe problem gambling, but this pattern was not found in the low-stress condition.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)263-283
Number of pages21
JournalInternational Journal of Stress Management
Volume18
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2011

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Gambling
Impulsive Behavior
Disease Susceptibility
gambling
Psychological Stress
coping
Students
student
Impulsivity
Life stress
Testing
Efficacy
female student
society

Cite this

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title = "Impulsivity, life stress, refusal efficacy, and problem gambling among Chinese : testing the diathesis-stress-coping model",
abstract = "This study extended the diathesis-stress-coping model (Lazarus and Folkman, 1984) to understand problem gambling in Chinese societies. We examined core model components of impulsivity trait (diathesis), life stress, and gambling refusal efficacy (coping efficacy) with 942 Chinese college students and 153 Chinese gamblers. Results showed that the three core model components exerted main effects on problem gambling for both samples. Among college students, refusal efficacy interacted with impulsivity to influence problem gambling in male and female students, and interacted with life stress in male students only. In particular, more severe problem gambling was associated with higher impulsivity in low- but not high-efficacy students, and with higher stress in low- but not high-efficacy male students. Among gamblers, impulsivity interacted with life stress to influence problem gambling. In the high stress condition, high- relative to low-impulsivity gamblers reported more severe problem gambling, but this pattern was not found in the low-stress condition.",
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Impulsivity, life stress, refusal efficacy, and problem gambling among Chinese : testing the diathesis-stress-coping model. / TANG, So Kum, Catherine; CHUA, Zhiren; WU, Anise M. S.

In: International Journal of Stress Management, Vol. 18, No. 3, 01.01.2011, p. 263-283.

Research output: Journal PublicationsJournal Article (refereed)Researchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

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AU - CHUA, Zhiren

AU - WU, Anise M. S.

PY - 2011/1/1

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N2 - This study extended the diathesis-stress-coping model (Lazarus and Folkman, 1984) to understand problem gambling in Chinese societies. We examined core model components of impulsivity trait (diathesis), life stress, and gambling refusal efficacy (coping efficacy) with 942 Chinese college students and 153 Chinese gamblers. Results showed that the three core model components exerted main effects on problem gambling for both samples. Among college students, refusal efficacy interacted with impulsivity to influence problem gambling in male and female students, and interacted with life stress in male students only. In particular, more severe problem gambling was associated with higher impulsivity in low- but not high-efficacy students, and with higher stress in low- but not high-efficacy male students. Among gamblers, impulsivity interacted with life stress to influence problem gambling. In the high stress condition, high- relative to low-impulsivity gamblers reported more severe problem gambling, but this pattern was not found in the low-stress condition.

AB - This study extended the diathesis-stress-coping model (Lazarus and Folkman, 1984) to understand problem gambling in Chinese societies. We examined core model components of impulsivity trait (diathesis), life stress, and gambling refusal efficacy (coping efficacy) with 942 Chinese college students and 153 Chinese gamblers. Results showed that the three core model components exerted main effects on problem gambling for both samples. Among college students, refusal efficacy interacted with impulsivity to influence problem gambling in male and female students, and interacted with life stress in male students only. In particular, more severe problem gambling was associated with higher impulsivity in low- but not high-efficacy students, and with higher stress in low- but not high-efficacy male students. Among gamblers, impulsivity interacted with life stress to influence problem gambling. In the high stress condition, high- relative to low-impulsivity gamblers reported more severe problem gambling, but this pattern was not found in the low-stress condition.

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