Introduction to a Culturally Sensitive Measure of Well-Being : Combining Life Satisfaction and Interdependent Happiness Across 49 Different Cultures

Kuba KRYS, Brian W. HAAS, Eric Raymond IGOU, Aleksandra KOSIARCZYK, Agata KOCIMSKA-BORTNOWSKA, Anna KWIATKOWSKA, Vivian Miu-Chi LUN, Fridanna MARICCHIOLO, Joonha PARK, Iva Poláčková ŠOLCOVÁ, David SIRLOPÚ, Yukiko UCHIDA, Christin-melanie VAUCLAIR, Vivian L. VIGNOLES, John M. ZELENSKI, Mladen ADAMOVIC, Charity S. AKOTIA, Isabelle ALBERT, Lily APPOH, D. M. Arévalo MIRAArno BALTIN, Patrick DENOUX, Alejandra DOMÍNGUEZ-ESPINOSA, Carla Sofia ESTEVES, Vladimer GAMSAKHURDIA, Márta FÜLÖP, Ragna B. GAROARSDÓTTIR, Alin GAVRELIUC, Diana BOER, David O. IGBOKWE, İdil IŞIK, Natalia KASCAKOVA, Lucie KLŮZOVÁ KRÁČMAROVÁ, Natasza KOSAKOWSKA-BEREZECKA, Olga KOSTOULA, Nicole KRONBERGER, J. Hannah LEE, Xinhui LIU, Magdalena ŁUŻNIAK-PIECHA, Arina MALYONOVA, Pablo Eduardo BARRIENTOS, Tamara MOHORIĆ, Oriana MOSCA, Elke MURDOCK, Nur Fariza MUSTAFFA, Martin NADER, Azar NADI, Ayu OKVITAWANLI, Yvette VAN OSCH, Vassilis PAVLOPOULOS, Zoran PAVLOVIĆ, Muhammad RIZWAN, Vladyslav ROMASHOV, Espen RØYSAMB, Ruta SARGAUTYTE, Beate SCHWARZ, Heyla A. SELIM, Ursula SERDAREVICH, Maria STOGIANNI, Chien-Ru SUN, Julien TEYSSIER, Wijnand A. P. VAN TILBURG, Claudio TORRES, Cai XING, Michael Harris BOND

Research output: Journal PublicationsJournal Article (refereed)peer-review

Abstract

How can one conclude that well-being is higher in country A than country B, when well-being is being measured according to the way people in country A think about well-being? We address this issue by proposing a new culturally sensitive method to comparing societal levels of well-being. We support our reasoning with data on life satisfaction and interdependent happiness focusing on individual and family, collected mostly from students, across forty-nine countries. We demonstrate that the relative idealization of the two types of well-being varies across cultural contexts and are associated with culturally different models of selfhood. Furthermore, we show that rankings of societal well-being based on life satisfaction tend to underestimate the contribution from interdependent happiness. We introduce a new culturally sensitive method for calculating societal well-being, and examine its construct validity by testing for associations with the experience of emotions and with individualism-collectivism. This new culturally sensitive approach represents a slight, yet important improvement in measuring well-being.
Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Happiness Studies
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 26 Dec 2022

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This work was supported by the Norway Grants 2014–2021 operated by the National Science Centre (Poland) under Project Contract No 2019/34/H/ HS6/00597 (GRIEG); National Science Centre (Poland) grant UMO-2016/23/D/HS6/02946; the Hungarian OTKA-K 135963, the Brazilian National Council for Scientific and Technological Development – CNPq under Grant 301298/2018-1; the Czech Science Foundation CSF under Grant 20-08583S, by the NPO, Systemic Risk Institute, LX22NPO510, EU - Next Generation EU; the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant 71873133; and the Department of Educational Studies, University of Roma Tre under biannual Grant DSF 2017–2018.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2022, The Author(s).

Keywords

  • Culture
  • Happiness
  • Well-being
  • Interdependent happiness
  • life satisfaction
  • Cultural sensitivity
  • Selfhoods
  • Self-construals
  • Life satisfaction

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