London 2012 : a Chinese charm offensive : a reputation rebuilt and an impression changed?

Research output: Journal PublicationsJournal Article (refereed)Researchpeer-review

Abstract

Displaying amiability (qinheli) was one of the duties of the Chinese athletes involved in the London 2012 Olympics. Why did the Chinese government ask them to behave in this way? How did the athletes carry out the mandate? Was their amiable performance intended to arouse nationalist sentiment among the Chinese? In response to these questions, two key political preoccupations of the Chinese authorities in the post-London Olympics era are identified: remedying foreigners' negative impressions of China, and gaining a greater input into the decision-making of the International Olympic Committee and its affiliated international sports federations. These objectives are shown to illustrate China's intention to rebuild its international reputation and challenge the status quo of the international sporting community.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1748-1757
Number of pages10
JournalInternational Journal of the History of Sport
Volume30
Issue number15
Early online date18 Dec 2013
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013

Fingerprint

reputation
athlete
China
federation
Sports
decision making
London Olympics
Athletes
community
performance
Decision Making
Olympics
International Community
Foreigners
Federation
Authority
Nationalists
Intentions
Government
Sentiment

Keywords

  • Chinese athletes
  • the London 2012 Olympics
  • amiability
  • reputation
  • nationalist sentiment

Cite this

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title = "London 2012 : a Chinese charm offensive : a reputation rebuilt and an impression changed?",
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London 2012 : a Chinese charm offensive : a reputation rebuilt and an impression changed? / CHU, Marcus P.

In: International Journal of the History of Sport, Vol. 30, No. 15, 2013, p. 1748-1757.

Research output: Journal PublicationsJournal Article (refereed)Researchpeer-review

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