Management learning perspectives on business ethics

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Abstract

In studying business ethics from the perspective of management learning, this chapter will focus on selected process issues related to the learning of business ethics. How did business ethics become part of the business and management curriculum? What are its educational goals? What teaching strategies are employed? What is the impact of business ethics education? What is the hidden curriculum of business ethics, acquired through socialization in educational and business institutions? How might business organizations be made more virtuous? How might apparent cultural differences in business ethics standards and practices be resolved?

This chapter does not examine the content of business ethics. There are more than 100 business ethics textbooks, and at least four established journals (Journal of Business Ethics, Business and Professional Ethics, Business Ethics Quarterly, Business Ethics: A European Review). These cover the substantive debates (e.g., deontology versus utilitarianism, cultural relativism versus universalism, the ethicality of particular practices and arrangements) that I omit. I assume that there are fundamental moral standards common to all humanity, regardless of circumstantial or cultural pressure, and that corrupt systems and cultures may be improved through exposure, principled dissent, public debate and education. Thus I am biased towards deontology, universalism and development.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationManagement learning : integrating perspectives in theory and practice
EditorsJohn BURGOYNE, Michael REYNOLDS
PublisherSAGE
Chapter10
Pages182-198
Number of pages17
ISBN (Print)9780803976436
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1997

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Business ethics
Management learning
Education
Deontology
Universalism
Curriculum
Ethics education
Socialization
Relativism
Teaching strategies
Cultural differences
Business organization
Professional ethics
Utilitarianism
Textbooks
Dissent

Cite this

SNELL, R. S. (1997). Management learning perspectives on business ethics. In J. BURGOYNE, & M. REYNOLDS (Eds.), Management learning : integrating perspectives in theory and practice (pp. 182-198). SAGE. https://doi.org/10.4135/9781446250488.n11
SNELL, Robin Stanley. / Management learning perspectives on business ethics. Management learning : integrating perspectives in theory and practice. editor / John BURGOYNE ; Michael REYNOLDS. SAGE, 1997. pp. 182-198
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SNELL, RS 1997, Management learning perspectives on business ethics. in J BURGOYNE & M REYNOLDS (eds), Management learning : integrating perspectives in theory and practice. SAGE, pp. 182-198. https://doi.org/10.4135/9781446250488.n11

Management learning perspectives on business ethics. / SNELL, Robin Stanley.

Management learning : integrating perspectives in theory and practice. ed. / John BURGOYNE; Michael REYNOLDS. SAGE, 1997. p. 182-198.

Research output: Book Chapters | Papers in Conference ProceedingsBook ChapterResearchpeer-review

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SNELL RS. Management learning perspectives on business ethics. In BURGOYNE J, REYNOLDS M, editors, Management learning : integrating perspectives in theory and practice. SAGE. 1997. p. 182-198 https://doi.org/10.4135/9781446250488.n11