Measuring Intercultural Effectiveness: An Integrative Approach

Geng CUI, Awa NJOKU

Research output: Journal PublicationsJournal Article (refereed)

74 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The present study examined the concept of intercultural effectiveness, which integrates five dimensions: language and interpersonal skills, social interaction, cultural empathy, personality traits, and managerial ability. The factorial structures of intercultural effectiveness were examined in reference to cross-cultural adjustment and job performance. The impact of background and situational variables on adjustment and job performance was also assessed. Seventy-four American business people in a foreign country (China) responded to the survey. The results show that effective cross-cultural adjustment and job performance are moderately correlated. The factorial structures of intercultural effectiveness differ in reference to cross-cultural adjustment and job performance. Cross-cultural adjustment emphasizes personality traits, whereas overseas job performance requires interpersonal skills. Marital status, presence of sojourners' family, and occupation of sojourners were found to influence adjustment and job
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)311 - 328
Number of pages18
JournalInternational Journal of Intercultural Relations
Volume16
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1992
Externally publishedYes
EventThe 35th Annual conference of The International Communication Association - United States, San Francisco, United States
Duration: 1 May 19891 May 1989

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Bibliographical note

An earlier version of this article was presented at the 35th Annual conference of The International Communication Association, San Francisco, California, May 1989.

Won the 1992 International Award for Outstanding IJIR Article of the Society for Intercultural Education, Training and Research (SIETAR), Washington, DC.

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