Migrating to GBA cities in mainland China: Assessing a model of psychological distance among Hong Kong working adults

Yuefeng Alex ZHU*, Ka Ho MOK, Genghua HUANG

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Journal PublicationsJournal Article (refereed)peer-review

Abstract

South–North and North–North migration patterns have received significant interest in the literature, and recently, studies have begun to investigate South–South migration. However, as yet, very few studies have addressed North–South migration or investigated the psychological facilitators and barriers that drive this growing migration pattern. With a sample from a representative group of Hong Kong adults, we evaluated the role of positive attitude in shaping the intention to migrate from Hong Kong, a more‐developed economy (a metropolitan area), to the Greater Bay Area (GBA) cities in Mainland China, considered a less‐developed economy (with less metropolitan areas). We found positive attitude toward GBA cities in Mainland China promoted migration intention both directly and indirectly, as mediated by situational concerns and experience of visiting Mainland GBA cities. The impact of a positive attitude on a field visit was found to be weaker among wealthier adults relative to their economically disadvantaged counterparts. The effect of a field visit on migration intention was found to be stronger among wealthier adults relative to their economically disadvantaged counterparts. The findings suggest that an understanding of social psychology has implications for policy makers through highlighting the different approaches and entry points that could be adopted to encourage migration by people of varying economic status.
Original languageEnglish
JournalAnalyses of Social Issues and Public Policy
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 28 Jan 2021

Bibliographical note

This study was funded by Research Collaboration and Development Fund, Lingnan University Research Committee. (Funding recipient: Professor Ka Ho Mok)

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