Moral Imperialism and the Social Dynamics of Human-Robot Interactions

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Abstract

The current discussion in robot ethics is confined to a very narrow subset of the problems that are occurring in human/robot interactions. In particular, consideration of the effects of the interactions between robots and humans on the human operator is almost entirely absent. In this paper, we take a closer look at common interaction patterns between humans and autonomous artefacts (in autonomous driving, eldercare, childcare, and war robots), and analyse them with a view towards understanding the hierarchical relations between the roles of human operator, machine, the machine’s manufacturer, and democratic lawgiving and law enforcement institutions. Our analysis shows that there is considerable reason to be concerned about how interactions between individuals and machines will impact human freedom, autonomy, and dignity. These effects must be moved into the center of attention of robot ethics researchers in order to prevent causing unanticipated harm not only to individual humans, but to our understanding of what constitutes a human being and its essential freedom and dignity.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - 7 Jun 2017
EventZagreb Applied Ethics Conference 2017: The Ethics of Robotics and Artificial Intelligence - Palace of the Matrix Croatica, Zagreb, Croatia
Duration: 5 Jun 20177 Jun 2017
http://upf.hr/en/zaec-2017/ (Conference Website)

Conference

ConferenceZagreb Applied Ethics Conference 2017: The Ethics of Robotics and Artificial Intelligence
CountryCroatia
CityZagreb
Period5/06/177/06/17
Internet address

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MATTHIAS, A. (2017). Moral Imperialism and the Social Dynamics of Human-Robot Interactions. Paper presented at Zagreb Applied Ethics Conference 2017: The Ethics of Robotics and Artificial Intelligence, Zagreb, Croatia.