One novel virus, different beliefs as playmakers towards disease spread in Africa: looking at COVID-19 from a religious lens

Edward Kwabena AMEYAW, John Elvis HAGAN*, Bright Opoku AHINKORAH, Abdul Aziz SEIDU, Thomas SCHACK

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Journal PublicationsJournal Article (refereed)peer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Religious and spiritual observances that draw large people together are pervasive in many parts of the world, including Africa. With the recent emergence of COVID-19, these mass religious gatherings may pose significant threats to human health. Given the compromised healthcare systems in many parts of Africa, faith-based institutions have a huge responsibility towards the management of the potential spread of the virus through effective organizational strategies or interventions. This essay sheds light on what the novel virus has to do with religion, the role of religious practices in inhibiting or spreading COVID-19, and what appropriate evidence-based interventions religious or faith-based organizations could adopt to help prevent the spread of the disease in Africa through a unity of thoughts for religious action.

Original languageEnglish
Article number365
Number of pages5
JournalThe Pan African medical journal
Volume36
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 28 Aug 2020
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Africa
  • Allah
  • Christianity
  • COVID-19
  • God
  • Islam
  • religion
  • religious rituals
  • spirituality

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