Parental Demandingness and Executive Functioning in Predicting Anxiety among Children in a Longitudinal Community Study

Barbara Chuen Yee LO, Sin Kan CHAN, Ting Kin NG, Anna Wai Man CHOI

Research output: Journal PublicationsJournal Article (refereed)Researchpeer-review

Abstract

Theoretical models and empirical studies of anxiety have predominately focused on the main effects of various predictors such as executive functioning deficits on anxiety. This study examined the moderating role of parental demandingness in the relationship between executive functioning deficits and anxiety in children. Ninety children (46.67% female) aged from 9 to 14 years completed several executive functioning tasks and a measure of anxiety. Parental demandingness was rated based on an observation of parent-child interactions. The children completed the anxiety measure again at one-year follow-up. The results showed that parental demandingness significantly moderated the prospective relationship between executive functioning deficits and anxiety, such that the association between executive functioning deficits and anxiety in children was weaker when parental demandingness was lower. These findings suggest that low parental demandingness may serve as a protective factor that buffers the detrimental effects of executive functioning deficits on anxiety.
Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Youth and Adolescence
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 17 Aug 2019

Fingerprint

community research
Longitudinal Studies
Anxiety
anxiety
deficit
Buffers
parents
Theoretical Models
Observation
interaction

Bibliographical note

B.C.Y.L. conceptualised the study, conducted the analyses, administrated the project, supervised the research team, drafted and edited the manuscript; S.K.C. collected the data, conducted the analysis, drafted and edited the manuscript; T.K.N. conducted the analysis, drafted and edited the manuscript; A.W.M.C. drafted and edited the manuscript. All authors read and approved the final manuscript.

All procedures performed in studies involving human participants were in accordance with the ethical standards of the institutional and/or national research committee (Human Research Ethics Committee, The University of Honng Kong) and with the 1964 Helsinki declaration and its later amendments or comparable ethical standards.

Keywords

  • Anxiety
  • Executive functioning
  • Longitudinal study
  • Parental demandingness

Cite this

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title = "Parental Demandingness and Executive Functioning in Predicting Anxiety among Children in a Longitudinal Community Study",
abstract = "Theoretical models and empirical studies of anxiety have predominately focused on the main effects of various predictors such as executive functioning deficits on anxiety. This study examined the moderating role of parental demandingness in the relationship between executive functioning deficits and anxiety in children. Ninety children (46.67{\%} female) aged from 9 to 14 years completed several executive functioning tasks and a measure of anxiety. Parental demandingness was rated based on an observation of parent-child interactions. The children completed the anxiety measure again at one-year follow-up. The results showed that parental demandingness significantly moderated the prospective relationship between executive functioning deficits and anxiety, such that the association between executive functioning deficits and anxiety in children was weaker when parental demandingness was lower. These findings suggest that low parental demandingness may serve as a protective factor that buffers the detrimental effects of executive functioning deficits on anxiety.",
keywords = "Anxiety, Executive functioning, Longitudinal study, Parental demandingness",
author = "LO, {Barbara Chuen Yee} and CHAN, {Sin Kan} and NG, {Ting Kin} and CHOI, {Anna Wai Man}",
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Parental Demandingness and Executive Functioning in Predicting Anxiety among Children in a Longitudinal Community Study. / LO, Barbara Chuen Yee; CHAN, Sin Kan; NG, Ting Kin; CHOI, Anna Wai Man.

In: Journal of Youth and Adolescence, 17.08.2019.

Research output: Journal PublicationsJournal Article (refereed)Researchpeer-review

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AU - CHAN, Sin Kan

AU - NG, Ting Kin

AU - CHOI, Anna Wai Man

N1 - B.C.Y.L. conceptualised the study, conducted the analyses, administrated the project, supervised the research team, drafted and edited the manuscript; S.K.C. collected the data, conducted the analysis, drafted and edited the manuscript; T.K.N. conducted the analysis, drafted and edited the manuscript; A.W.M.C. drafted and edited the manuscript. All authors read and approved the final manuscript. All procedures performed in studies involving human participants were in accordance with the ethical standards of the institutional and/or national research committee (Human Research Ethics Committee, The University of Honng Kong) and with the 1964 Helsinki declaration and its later amendments or comparable ethical standards.

PY - 2019/8/17

Y1 - 2019/8/17

N2 - Theoretical models and empirical studies of anxiety have predominately focused on the main effects of various predictors such as executive functioning deficits on anxiety. This study examined the moderating role of parental demandingness in the relationship between executive functioning deficits and anxiety in children. Ninety children (46.67% female) aged from 9 to 14 years completed several executive functioning tasks and a measure of anxiety. Parental demandingness was rated based on an observation of parent-child interactions. The children completed the anxiety measure again at one-year follow-up. The results showed that parental demandingness significantly moderated the prospective relationship between executive functioning deficits and anxiety, such that the association between executive functioning deficits and anxiety in children was weaker when parental demandingness was lower. These findings suggest that low parental demandingness may serve as a protective factor that buffers the detrimental effects of executive functioning deficits on anxiety.

AB - Theoretical models and empirical studies of anxiety have predominately focused on the main effects of various predictors such as executive functioning deficits on anxiety. This study examined the moderating role of parental demandingness in the relationship between executive functioning deficits and anxiety in children. Ninety children (46.67% female) aged from 9 to 14 years completed several executive functioning tasks and a measure of anxiety. Parental demandingness was rated based on an observation of parent-child interactions. The children completed the anxiety measure again at one-year follow-up. The results showed that parental demandingness significantly moderated the prospective relationship between executive functioning deficits and anxiety, such that the association between executive functioning deficits and anxiety in children was weaker when parental demandingness was lower. These findings suggest that low parental demandingness may serve as a protective factor that buffers the detrimental effects of executive functioning deficits on anxiety.

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