Peer Victimization, School Connectedness, and Mental Well-Being among Adolescents

Sadaf ARIF, Saira KHAN*, Nelofur K. RAUF, Rayna SADIA

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Journal PublicationsJournal Article (refereed)

Abstract

The objective of study was to explore relationship between peer victimization (PV), school connectedness (SC) and mental wellbeing (MWB) among adolescents. It also aimed to explore the differences based on gender and status of school across study variables. Multidimensional Peer Victimization Scale (Mynard and Joseph, 2000), School Connectedness Scale (SCS) (Lohmeire and Lee, 2011), and Warwick-Edinburgh Mental Well-Being Scale (Stewart-Brown and Janmohamed, 2008) were used to assess study variables. In first phase, initial review of instruments was carried out. Experts from field of psychology were approached and instruments were adapted as per Pakistani culture. In the second phase, data was collected from 400 school and college going adolescents with age ranging from 14 to 19 years (M = 16.16, SD = 1.86) through convenience sampling. It was found that PV and its subscales (i.e., Physical Victimization, Verbal Victimization, Social Manipulation, and Attack on Property) were negatively related with SC and MWB. Mediational analysis indicated that SC mediates the relationship between PV and MWB and accounts for an additional 8% variance. Nonsignificant differences were observed with reference to gender and status of school on PV and its subscales except for Social Manipulation where girls had higher scores than boys. Nonsignificant differences were also apparent on SC and MWB across gender and status of school. Across status of school, students from government schools had higher scores on social manipulation as compared to students from private schools. It can be inferred that peer victimization negatively affects mental well-being by lowering school connectedness.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)835-851
Number of pages17
JournalPakistan Journal of Psychological Research
Volume34
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2019

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Crime Victims
Child Welfare
Students

Keywords

  • Adolescents
  • Mental wellbeing
  • Peer victimization
  • School connectedness
  • Verbal victimization

Cite this

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title = "Peer Victimization, School Connectedness, and Mental Well-Being among Adolescents",
abstract = "The objective of study was to explore relationship between peer victimization (PV), school connectedness (SC) and mental wellbeing (MWB) among adolescents. It also aimed to explore the differences based on gender and status of school across study variables. Multidimensional Peer Victimization Scale (Mynard and Joseph, 2000), School Connectedness Scale (SCS) (Lohmeire and Lee, 2011), and Warwick-Edinburgh Mental Well-Being Scale (Stewart-Brown and Janmohamed, 2008) were used to assess study variables. In first phase, initial review of instruments was carried out. Experts from field of psychology were approached and instruments were adapted as per Pakistani culture. In the second phase, data was collected from 400 school and college going adolescents with age ranging from 14 to 19 years (M = 16.16, SD = 1.86) through convenience sampling. It was found that PV and its subscales (i.e., Physical Victimization, Verbal Victimization, Social Manipulation, and Attack on Property) were negatively related with SC and MWB. Mediational analysis indicated that SC mediates the relationship between PV and MWB and accounts for an additional 8{\%} variance. Nonsignificant differences were observed with reference to gender and status of school on PV and its subscales except for Social Manipulation where girls had higher scores than boys. Nonsignificant differences were also apparent on SC and MWB across gender and status of school. Across status of school, students from government schools had higher scores on social manipulation as compared to students from private schools. It can be inferred that peer victimization negatively affects mental well-being by lowering school connectedness.",
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author = "Sadaf ARIF and Saira KHAN and RAUF, {Nelofur K.} and Rayna SADIA",
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Peer Victimization, School Connectedness, and Mental Well-Being among Adolescents. / ARIF, Sadaf; KHAN, Saira; RAUF, Nelofur K.; SADIA, Rayna .

In: Pakistan Journal of Psychological Research, Vol. 34, No. 4, 12.2019, p. 835-851.

Research output: Journal PublicationsJournal Article (refereed)

TY - JOUR

T1 - Peer Victimization, School Connectedness, and Mental Well-Being among Adolescents

AU - ARIF, Sadaf

AU - KHAN, Saira

AU - RAUF, Nelofur K.

AU - SADIA, Rayna

PY - 2019/12

Y1 - 2019/12

N2 - The objective of study was to explore relationship between peer victimization (PV), school connectedness (SC) and mental wellbeing (MWB) among adolescents. It also aimed to explore the differences based on gender and status of school across study variables. Multidimensional Peer Victimization Scale (Mynard and Joseph, 2000), School Connectedness Scale (SCS) (Lohmeire and Lee, 2011), and Warwick-Edinburgh Mental Well-Being Scale (Stewart-Brown and Janmohamed, 2008) were used to assess study variables. In first phase, initial review of instruments was carried out. Experts from field of psychology were approached and instruments were adapted as per Pakistani culture. In the second phase, data was collected from 400 school and college going adolescents with age ranging from 14 to 19 years (M = 16.16, SD = 1.86) through convenience sampling. It was found that PV and its subscales (i.e., Physical Victimization, Verbal Victimization, Social Manipulation, and Attack on Property) were negatively related with SC and MWB. Mediational analysis indicated that SC mediates the relationship between PV and MWB and accounts for an additional 8% variance. Nonsignificant differences were observed with reference to gender and status of school on PV and its subscales except for Social Manipulation where girls had higher scores than boys. Nonsignificant differences were also apparent on SC and MWB across gender and status of school. Across status of school, students from government schools had higher scores on social manipulation as compared to students from private schools. It can be inferred that peer victimization negatively affects mental well-being by lowering school connectedness.

AB - The objective of study was to explore relationship between peer victimization (PV), school connectedness (SC) and mental wellbeing (MWB) among adolescents. It also aimed to explore the differences based on gender and status of school across study variables. Multidimensional Peer Victimization Scale (Mynard and Joseph, 2000), School Connectedness Scale (SCS) (Lohmeire and Lee, 2011), and Warwick-Edinburgh Mental Well-Being Scale (Stewart-Brown and Janmohamed, 2008) were used to assess study variables. In first phase, initial review of instruments was carried out. Experts from field of psychology were approached and instruments were adapted as per Pakistani culture. In the second phase, data was collected from 400 school and college going adolescents with age ranging from 14 to 19 years (M = 16.16, SD = 1.86) through convenience sampling. It was found that PV and its subscales (i.e., Physical Victimization, Verbal Victimization, Social Manipulation, and Attack on Property) were negatively related with SC and MWB. Mediational analysis indicated that SC mediates the relationship between PV and MWB and accounts for an additional 8% variance. Nonsignificant differences were observed with reference to gender and status of school on PV and its subscales except for Social Manipulation where girls had higher scores than boys. Nonsignificant differences were also apparent on SC and MWB across gender and status of school. Across status of school, students from government schools had higher scores on social manipulation as compared to students from private schools. It can be inferred that peer victimization negatively affects mental well-being by lowering school connectedness.

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KW - Mental wellbeing

KW - Peer victimization

KW - School connectedness

KW - Verbal victimization

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U2 - 10.33824/PJPR.2019.34.4.45

DO - 10.33824/PJPR.2019.34.4.45

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JO - Pakistan Journal of Psychological Research

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SN - 1016-0604

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