Reflections on marriage and family therapy emergent from international dialogues in China

Jason DIAS, Albert CHAN, James UNGVARSKY, James ORAKER, Heatherlyn P. CLEARE-HOFFMAN

Research output: Journal PublicationsJournal Article (refereed)Researchpeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Family is a central construct in Chinese life. Although central, it is also a changing construct as China becomes an increasingly international nation. This article discusses the Chinese family system in context, the challenges to existing constructs, and issues of cultural competence in the midst of change. Using diverse constructs such as pastoral care, existential ethics, and systemic approaches, it is possible to develop means of approaching family life in China both therapeutically and in a way that respects the freedom and dignity of a people in flux.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)268-275
Number of pages8
JournalHumanistic Psychologist
Volume39
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2011

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Marital Therapy
Family Therapy
China
Pastoral Care
Cultural Competency
Ethics

Cite this

DIAS, Jason ; CHAN, Albert ; UNGVARSKY, James ; ORAKER, James ; CLEARE-HOFFMAN, Heatherlyn P. / Reflections on marriage and family therapy emergent from international dialogues in China. In: Humanistic Psychologist. 2011 ; Vol. 39, No. 3. pp. 268-275.
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DIAS, J, CHAN, A, UNGVARSKY, J, ORAKER, J & CLEARE-HOFFMAN, HP 2011, 'Reflections on marriage and family therapy emergent from international dialogues in China', Humanistic Psychologist, vol. 39, no. 3, pp. 268-275. https://doi.org/10.1080/08873267.2011.592434

Reflections on marriage and family therapy emergent from international dialogues in China. / DIAS, Jason; CHAN, Albert; UNGVARSKY, James; ORAKER, James; CLEARE-HOFFMAN, Heatherlyn P.

In: Humanistic Psychologist, Vol. 39, No. 3, 01.01.2011, p. 268-275.

Research output: Journal PublicationsJournal Article (refereed)Researchpeer-review

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