Religious participation and children's education : a social capital approach

Research output: Journal PublicationsJournal Article (refereed)Researchpeer-review

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Based on the argument in both economic and sociological literature that religion is conducive to children’s human capital formation, this paper provides a model of religious participation and explores a mechanism that “social capital” affects children’s education, a la Coleman [Coleman, J.S., 1988. Social capital in the creation of human capital. American Journal of Sociology 94, S95–S120]. The model generates several interesting implications, which help explain some important stylized facts about education and religion. Further, in a dynamic setting, the model shows that there exists a steady state in which individuals allocate a positive amount of time and resources to religious activities. Thus, it complements the existing literature to explain why seemingly unproductive religions can be everlasting.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)303-317
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Economic Behavior and Organization
Volume65
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Feb 2008

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Participation
Education
Social capital
Resources
Stylized facts
Human capital
Sociology
Human capital formation
Economics

Keywords

  • Human capital
  • Religious participation
  • Social capital

Cite this

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Religious participation and children's education : a social capital approach. / FAN, Chengze, Simon.

In: Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization, Vol. 65, No. 2, 01.02.2008, p. 303-317.

Research output: Journal PublicationsJournal Article (refereed)Researchpeer-review

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AB - Based on the argument in both economic and sociological literature that religion is conducive to children’s human capital formation, this paper provides a model of religious participation and explores a mechanism that “social capital” affects children’s education, a la Coleman [Coleman, J.S., 1988. Social capital in the creation of human capital. American Journal of Sociology 94, S95–S120]. The model generates several interesting implications, which help explain some important stylized facts about education and religion. Further, in a dynamic setting, the model shows that there exists a steady state in which individuals allocate a positive amount of time and resources to religious activities. Thus, it complements the existing literature to explain why seemingly unproductive religions can be everlasting.

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