Roja revisited

    Research output: Journal PublicationsJournal Article (refereed)Researchpeer-review

    Abstract

    Venkatesh Chakravarthy and M S S Pandian's response ('More on Roja', EPW, March 12, 1994) to my article ('Integrating Whose Nation? Tourists and Terrorists in Roja', EPW, January 15, 1994) helps open out the debate on contemporary popular cinema in important directions. As both our interventions make evident, the debate is not just about one film but about how to characterise dominant representations of the nation, the state and the Indian middle class today. Chakravarthy and Pandian argue that "the entire narrative of the film is keyed to the disavowal of the state and the proclivities of female subjectivity" and that "the apparent inability of the state" therefore "actually masks its silent and powerful ability", making the "ultimate victors" in the film "the state and the Hindu-patriarchal cultue".
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)1299
    JournalEconomic and Political Weekly
    Volume29
    Issue number21
    Publication statusPublished - 21 May 1994

    Fingerprint

    cinema
    middle class
    subjectivity
    tourist
    narrative
    ability
    Middle class
    Tourists
    Subjectivity
    Cinema

    Cite this

    NIRANJANA, Tejaswini. / Roja revisited. In: Economic and Political Weekly. 1994 ; Vol. 29, No. 21. pp. 1299.
    @article{faa052ddf2ea4f5d8df8441f269c098f,
    title = "Roja revisited",
    abstract = "Venkatesh Chakravarthy and M S S Pandian's response ('More on Roja', EPW, March 12, 1994) to my article ('Integrating Whose Nation? Tourists and Terrorists in Roja', EPW, January 15, 1994) helps open out the debate on contemporary popular cinema in important directions. As both our interventions make evident, the debate is not just about one film but about how to characterise dominant representations of the nation, the state and the Indian middle class today. Chakravarthy and Pandian argue that {"}the entire narrative of the film is keyed to the disavowal of the state and the proclivities of female subjectivity{"} and that {"}the apparent inability of the state{"} therefore {"}actually masks its silent and powerful ability{"}, making the {"}ultimate victors{"} in the film {"}the state and the Hindu-patriarchal cultue{"}.",
    author = "Tejaswini NIRANJANA",
    year = "1994",
    month = "5",
    day = "21",
    language = "English",
    volume = "29",
    pages = "1299",
    journal = "Economic and Political Weekly",
    issn = "0012-9976",
    publisher = "Economic and Political Weekly",
    number = "21",

    }

    NIRANJANA, T 1994, 'Roja revisited', Economic and Political Weekly, vol. 29, no. 21, pp. 1299.

    Roja revisited. / NIRANJANA, Tejaswini.

    In: Economic and Political Weekly, Vol. 29, No. 21, 21.05.1994, p. 1299.

    Research output: Journal PublicationsJournal Article (refereed)Researchpeer-review

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Roja revisited

    AU - NIRANJANA, Tejaswini

    PY - 1994/5/21

    Y1 - 1994/5/21

    N2 - Venkatesh Chakravarthy and M S S Pandian's response ('More on Roja', EPW, March 12, 1994) to my article ('Integrating Whose Nation? Tourists and Terrorists in Roja', EPW, January 15, 1994) helps open out the debate on contemporary popular cinema in important directions. As both our interventions make evident, the debate is not just about one film but about how to characterise dominant representations of the nation, the state and the Indian middle class today. Chakravarthy and Pandian argue that "the entire narrative of the film is keyed to the disavowal of the state and the proclivities of female subjectivity" and that "the apparent inability of the state" therefore "actually masks its silent and powerful ability", making the "ultimate victors" in the film "the state and the Hindu-patriarchal cultue".

    AB - Venkatesh Chakravarthy and M S S Pandian's response ('More on Roja', EPW, March 12, 1994) to my article ('Integrating Whose Nation? Tourists and Terrorists in Roja', EPW, January 15, 1994) helps open out the debate on contemporary popular cinema in important directions. As both our interventions make evident, the debate is not just about one film but about how to characterise dominant representations of the nation, the state and the Indian middle class today. Chakravarthy and Pandian argue that "the entire narrative of the film is keyed to the disavowal of the state and the proclivities of female subjectivity" and that "the apparent inability of the state" therefore "actually masks its silent and powerful ability", making the "ultimate victors" in the film "the state and the Hindu-patriarchal cultue".

    UR - http://commons.ln.edu.hk/sw_master/4738

    M3 - Journal Article (refereed)

    VL - 29

    SP - 1299

    JO - Economic and Political Weekly

    JF - Economic and Political Weekly

    SN - 0012-9976

    IS - 21

    ER -