Segregation dimensions and development differentials of ethnic enclave

Kwok Leung, Steve CHAN

Research output: Journal PublicationsJournal Article (refereed)

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to employ enclave economy in the perspective of economic sociology to explain the existence and process of the Thai enclave in Hong Kong.Design/methodology/approach - In-depth interviews and case studies are employed in relation to Thai restaurant and grocery shop owners and employees in Hong Kong. Findings - This study is an attempt to explain the clustering of Thai ethnic small businesses in Kowloon City through a discourse on the ethnic enclave economy. The Thai migrant enclave in Hong Kong is explored with dimensions of segregation, namely evenness, exposure, clustering, concentration and centralization (Massey and Denton's, 1988). This study suggests that these Thai enclave businesses have two differentials compared to the findings of Zhou (1992) in Chinatown restaurants in New York. Social implications - The findings provide evidences for social workers, migrant associations and policy makers in developing ideas of ethnic business enabling. There should be wide range of supporting and welfare policies for the empowerment ofmigrants and minority ethnic groups. An immigrant enclave should no longer be regarded as a ghetto for many business chances can be found there. Originality/value - Two ethnic economy development differentials are developed. First, ethnicity similarity between the minority group and the majority ethnic enables ethnic business accessing earlier to an interethnic clientele from wider society. Second, internal factors of the ethnic enclave and external factors of the wider society have constrained the diversification of ethnic business.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)82-96
Number of pages15
JournalInternational Journal of Social Economics
Volume42
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2015

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segregation
Hong Kong
economy
migrant
minority
ethnic structure
economic sociology
ghetto
small business
centralization
diversification
social policy
social worker
empowerment
ethnic group
ethnicity
immigrant
employee
discourse
methodology

Bibliographical note

A previous version of this paper has been presented in the First International Conference on Interdisciplinary Research and Development 2011, Royal Institute of Thailand.

Cite this

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title = "Segregation dimensions and development differentials of ethnic enclave",
abstract = "Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to employ enclave economy in the perspective of economic sociology to explain the existence and process of the Thai enclave in Hong Kong.Design/methodology/approach - In-depth interviews and case studies are employed in relation to Thai restaurant and grocery shop owners and employees in Hong Kong. Findings - This study is an attempt to explain the clustering of Thai ethnic small businesses in Kowloon City through a discourse on the ethnic enclave economy. The Thai migrant enclave in Hong Kong is explored with dimensions of segregation, namely evenness, exposure, clustering, concentration and centralization (Massey and Denton's, 1988). This study suggests that these Thai enclave businesses have two differentials compared to the findings of Zhou (1992) in Chinatown restaurants in New York. Social implications - The findings provide evidences for social workers, migrant associations and policy makers in developing ideas of ethnic business enabling. There should be wide range of supporting and welfare policies for the empowerment ofmigrants and minority ethnic groups. An immigrant enclave should no longer be regarded as a ghetto for many business chances can be found there. Originality/value - Two ethnic economy development differentials are developed. First, ethnicity similarity between the minority group and the majority ethnic enables ethnic business accessing earlier to an interethnic clientele from wider society. Second, internal factors of the ethnic enclave and external factors of the wider society have constrained the diversification of ethnic business.",
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Segregation dimensions and development differentials of ethnic enclave. / CHAN, Kwok Leung, Steve.

In: International Journal of Social Economics, Vol. 42, No. 1, 01.01.2015, p. 82-96.

Research output: Journal PublicationsJournal Article (refereed)

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AB - Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to employ enclave economy in the perspective of economic sociology to explain the existence and process of the Thai enclave in Hong Kong.Design/methodology/approach - In-depth interviews and case studies are employed in relation to Thai restaurant and grocery shop owners and employees in Hong Kong. Findings - This study is an attempt to explain the clustering of Thai ethnic small businesses in Kowloon City through a discourse on the ethnic enclave economy. The Thai migrant enclave in Hong Kong is explored with dimensions of segregation, namely evenness, exposure, clustering, concentration and centralization (Massey and Denton's, 1988). This study suggests that these Thai enclave businesses have two differentials compared to the findings of Zhou (1992) in Chinatown restaurants in New York. Social implications - The findings provide evidences for social workers, migrant associations and policy makers in developing ideas of ethnic business enabling. There should be wide range of supporting and welfare policies for the empowerment ofmigrants and minority ethnic groups. An immigrant enclave should no longer be regarded as a ghetto for many business chances can be found there. Originality/value - Two ethnic economy development differentials are developed. First, ethnicity similarity between the minority group and the majority ethnic enables ethnic business accessing earlier to an interethnic clientele from wider society. Second, internal factors of the ethnic enclave and external factors of the wider society have constrained the diversification of ethnic business.

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