Structure and growth in small Hong Kong enterprises

Agnes LAU, Robin SNELL

Research output: Journal PublicationsJournal Article (refereed)Researchpeer-review

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A study of 21 small‐to‐medium sized Hong Kong Chinese business organizations analysed the relationship between structural characteristics and growth patterns. Qualitative data were collected through intensive, one‐to‐one interviews conducted in Cantonese. Three propositions concerning growth and development were developed. The first proposition is that for sustained growth towards a size of 100 employees the structure may remain predominantly simple, but there must also be some elements of adhocracy or professional bureaucracy, and the strategic apex must want the company to grow. Second, for a manufacturing company to grow to a point beyond 100 employees, its predominant form must change from simple structure to machine bureaucracy. Third, for sustained, robust growth once a manufacturing company has reached well over 100 employees in size, it either requires elements of divisional form structure, or special human resourcefulness manifested as exceptionally good staff relationships and business contacts.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)29-47
Number of pages19
JournalInternational Journal of Entrepreneurial Behaviour and Research
Volume2
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 1996
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Hong Kong
Employees
Manufacturing companies
Bureaucracy
Staff
Sustained growth
Growth and development
Qualitative data
Business organization

Bibliographical note

Charles Foley at the Management Development Centre of Hong Kong (MDCHK) initiated this project, and we thank him and MDCHK for their sponsorship. The research would not have been possible without the help of Michelle Chow and Madeline Yan, Research Assistants at the MDCHK, who conducted most of the interviews. The viewpoints expressed in this report are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect those of the MDC.

Cite this

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Structure and growth in small Hong Kong enterprises. / LAU, Agnes; SNELL, Robin.

In: International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behaviour and Research, Vol. 2, No. 3, 09.1996, p. 29-47.

Research output: Journal PublicationsJournal Article (refereed)Researchpeer-review

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