Technology‐assisted learning : a longitudinal field study of knowledge category , learning effectiveness and satisfaction in language learning

W. HUI, P. J. -H. HU, T. H. K. CLARK, K. Y. TAM, J. MILTON

Research output: Journal PublicationsJournal Article (refereed)Researchpeer-review

66 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A field experiment compares the effectiveness and satisfaction associated with technology-assisted learning with that of face-to-face learning. The empirical evidence suggests thattechnology-assisted learning effectiveness depends on the target knowledge category. Buildingon Kolb’s experiential learning model, we show that technology-assisted learning improvesstudents’ acquisition of knowledge that demands abstract conceptualization and reflectiveobservation but adversely affects their ability to obtain knowledge that requires concreteexperience. Technology-assisted learning better supports vocabulary learning than face-to-facelearning but is comparatively less effective in developing listening comprehension skills. Inaddition, according to empirical tests, perceived ease of learning and learning communitysupport significantly predict both perceived learning effectiveness and learning satisfaction.Overall, the results support our hypotheses and research model and suggest instructors shouldconsider the target knowledge when considering technology-assisted learning options ordesigning a Web-based course. In addition, a supportive learning community can maketechnology-assisted learning easier for students and increase their learning satisfaction
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)245-259
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Computer Assisted Learning
Volume24
Issue number3
Early online date14 Sep 2007
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2008
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

field of study
language
learning
Students
Experiments
listening comprehension
vocabulary
instructor

Keywords

  • control group
  • empirical
  • information systems
  • Internet
  • language learning
  • satisfaction
  • World Wide Web

Cite this

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title = "Technology‐assisted learning : a longitudinal field study of knowledge category , learning effectiveness and satisfaction in language learning",
abstract = "A field experiment compares the effectiveness and satisfaction associated with technology-assisted learning with that of face-to-face learning. The empirical evidence suggests thattechnology-assisted learning effectiveness depends on the target knowledge category. Buildingon Kolb’s experiential learning model, we show that technology-assisted learning improvesstudents’ acquisition of knowledge that demands abstract conceptualization and reflectiveobservation but adversely affects their ability to obtain knowledge that requires concreteexperience. Technology-assisted learning better supports vocabulary learning than face-to-facelearning but is comparatively less effective in developing listening comprehension skills. Inaddition, according to empirical tests, perceived ease of learning and learning communitysupport significantly predict both perceived learning effectiveness and learning satisfaction.Overall, the results support our hypotheses and research model and suggest instructors shouldconsider the target knowledge when considering technology-assisted learning options ordesigning a Web-based course. In addition, a supportive learning community can maketechnology-assisted learning easier for students and increase their learning satisfaction",
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Technology‐assisted learning : a longitudinal field study of knowledge category , learning effectiveness and satisfaction in language learning. / HUI, W.; HU, P. J. -H.; CLARK, T. H. K.; TAM, K. Y.; MILTON, J.

In: Journal of Computer Assisted Learning, Vol. 24, No. 3, 06.2008, p. 245-259.

Research output: Journal PublicationsJournal Article (refereed)Researchpeer-review

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