The aesthetics of parallelism in Chinese poetry : the case of Xie Lingyun

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Abstract

Natural grace and exquisite craftsmanship stand as polarities in the aesthetics of classical Chinese poetry. As early as the Chu ci, a style of ornate embellishment can be distinctly seen. This reached inundating proportions in the Han (206 B.C.-220A.D.) epideictic fu, and remained visible in shi poetry in a line of poets from Cao Zhi (192-232) through the Southern – Northern Dynasties (420-589), who display a penchant for flowery adornment that underpinned Chinese aesthetics until the early years of the Tang (618-907). The eager forging of parallelism in poetry represents one feature of this aesthetic of elaborate refinement; as Liu Xie (c.465-C.532) observes, poetry from Liu- Song (420-479) times up to his age has “adopted parallel couplets that extend to a hundred words” (Wenxin diaolong 6, Ming shi, Liu 1960, 67).
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationThe Yields of Transition: Literature, Art and Philosophy in Early Medieval China
PublisherCambridge Scholars
Pages203-224
Number of pages22
ISBN (Print)9781443827140
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2011

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Chinese Poetry
Poetry
Parallelism
Aesthetics
Polarity
Proportion
Ming
Adornment
Poet
Visible
Penchant
Epideictic
Craftsmanship
Couplet
Grace
Chinese Aesthetics
Song
Dynasty
Embellishment

Cite this

KWONG, Y. T. C. (2011). The aesthetics of parallelism in Chinese poetry : the case of Xie Lingyun. In The Yields of Transition: Literature, Art and Philosophy in Early Medieval China (pp. 203-224). Cambridge Scholars.
KWONG, Yim Tze, Charles. / The aesthetics of parallelism in Chinese poetry : the case of Xie Lingyun. The Yields of Transition: Literature, Art and Philosophy in Early Medieval China. Cambridge Scholars, 2011. pp. 203-224
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KWONG, YTC 2011, The aesthetics of parallelism in Chinese poetry : the case of Xie Lingyun. in The Yields of Transition: Literature, Art and Philosophy in Early Medieval China. Cambridge Scholars, pp. 203-224.

The aesthetics of parallelism in Chinese poetry : the case of Xie Lingyun. / KWONG, Yim Tze, Charles.

The Yields of Transition: Literature, Art and Philosophy in Early Medieval China. Cambridge Scholars, 2011. p. 203-224.

Research output: Book Chapters | Papers in Conference ProceedingsBook ChapterResearchpeer-review

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KWONG YTC. The aesthetics of parallelism in Chinese poetry : the case of Xie Lingyun. In The Yields of Transition: Literature, Art and Philosophy in Early Medieval China. Cambridge Scholars. 2011. p. 203-224