The American-Returned Students : Educational Networks and New Forms of Business in Early Republican China

Peter E. HAMILTON*

*Corresponding author for this work

    Research output: Book Chapters | Papers in Conference ProceedingsBook ChapterResearchpeer-review

    Abstract

    Scholars have long emphasized the key role played by foreign translations and transnational circulations of knowledge in the seismic evolutions of the late Qing and Republican eras. From the establishment of the Tongwenguan (同文館) in 1862 and the first overseas educational missions of the 1870s to missionary schools and the translations of Yan Fu (嚴復), these new circuits of knowledge production accelerated both social and political change, from the Qing state’s modernization efforts to everyday urban life.1 In turn, scholars have long emphasized the abolition of the civil service examinations in 1905 as a turning-point in both educational reform and the political foment that would culminate in the 1911 Revolution.
    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationKnowledge, Power, and Networks : Elites in Transition in Modern China
    EditorsCécile ARMAND, Christian HENRIOT, Huei-min SUN
    PublisherBrill
    Chapter9
    Pages258-288
    Number of pages31
    ISBN (Electronic)9789004520479
    ISBN (Print)9789004506985
    Publication statusPublished - Sep 2022

    Publication series

    NameStudies on Modern East Asian History
    PublisherBrill
    Volume3
    ISSN (Print)2468-8223

    Bibliographical note

    Portions of this chapter appeared in the author's book Made in Hong Kong: Transpacific Networks and a New History of Globalization (Columbia University Press, Studies of the Weatherhead East Asian Institute, 2021).

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