The chinese adolescent materialism scale: Psychometric properties and normative profiles

Daniel T.L. SHEK*, Cecilia M.S. MA, Li LIN

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Book Chapters | Papers in Conference ProceedingsBook ChapterResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Although preoccupation with material possession is a growing concern in Chinese adolescents, there is a lack of validated measures of adolescent materialism in different Chinese contexts. Based on a thorough literature review, the Chinese Adolescent Materialism Scale (CAMS) was developed and administered in 1,658 Chinese secondary school students. Results showed that the CAMS was internally consistent. Factor analyses showed that three factors were intrinsic to the scale. Consistent with expectations, the CAMS scores were significantly related to measures of morality, egocentrism, spirituality and empathy. Analyses of responses to the CAMS items revealed that a significant proportion of respondents displayed materialistic beliefs.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationHuman Developmental Research: Experience from Research in Hong Kong
EditorsDaniel T.L. SHEK, Cecilia M.S. MA, Lu YU, Joav MERRICK
PublisherNova Science Publishers, Inc.
Chapter13
Pages239-253
Number of pages15
ISBN (Electronic)9781628081671
ISBN (Print)9781628081664
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2014
Externally publishedYes

Publication series

NamePediatrics, Child and Adolescent Health
PublisherNova Science Publishers

Bibliographical note

The preparation for this paper and the study are financially supported by the Law Society of Hong Kong. This chapter is based upon a special issue published in the International Journal on Disability and Human Development 2014:13(2). Permission has been obtained from the publisher De Gruyter in Berlin to publish this version of the papers in this book.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2014 Nova Science Publishers, Inc.

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